Surname: Abeel

Descendants of Captain David Abeel

Capt. David Abeel Capt. David Abeel, son of Johannes and Catharine (Schuyler) Abeel (brother to Christoffel, the father of John, father of Corn Plant), was born at Albany, N. Y., April 27, 1705, died Oct. 20, 1777. At an early age, after his father’s death, he was sent to New York and apprenticed to Mr. Schuyler in the dry goods business, and soon after reaching his majority he engaged in the flour and provision business, which he carried on successfully for many years. He held the position of Captain of the company of militia of foot of the city and

Captain David Abeel, Revolution Patriot

Capt. David Abeel Capt. David Abeel, Patriot of the Revolution, eldest son of Col. James and Gertrude (Neilson) Abeel, was born Jan. 13, 1763, died Oct. 31, 1840. He early evinced a taste for a seafaring life, and volunteered to serve with Captain Barry (afterwards Commodore Barry, U. S. N.) on the ship “Governor General,” which sailed under letters of marquee during the Revolution. He made a voyage to St. Eustatia in 1780, which lasted several months.  He next sailed as midshipman on the frigate Alliance, which took Col. Lawrence, our American minister, to France, in the early part of

Chief Cornplanter

Cornplanter (Corn Plant) Chief of the Seneca

Son of John Abeel and the Indian Princess, Alquipiso Corn Plant, KI ON-TWOG-KY (usually, but improperly spelled Cornplanter) was one of the most unique characters in American history, and it appears somewhat strange that after a lapse of a century or more the true history of his parentage should now for the first time be brought to light, proving beyond a doubt that he was a grandson of one of Albany’s most distinguished mayors. There may have been an effort on the part of those interested to cover up the facts at the time by permitting a misspelling the name

Line of David Abeel

David Abeel, Patriot of the Revolution, eldest son of Capt. David and Mary (Duyckinck) Abeel, was born in Albany, 1727. He married July 2, 1752, Neiltje, daughter of Garret Van Bergen and Annatje Meyer. He settled in Catskill as early as 1754. In 1771 he obtained a patent for one thousand acres of land “on the west side of and adjoining the brook called the Caterskill, at a place called the Bak-Oven.” This estate was within the bounds of the Catskill Patent, and was formerly owned by Abeel’s father-in-law. They had issue: Annatie, born in Albany, March, 1753; died in

Descendants of Johannes Abeel

Johannes Abeel Eldest son of Christopher Janse (Croom) Abeel, was born in Albany, March 23, 1667, died Jan. 28, 1711. He was a prosperous merchant, and was elected mayor of Albany, 1694-5. He removed to New Amsterdam and lived there for a time and on his return to Albany was elected a member of the Assembly in 1701; and in 1709 was again elected mayor of Albany. He married April 10, 1694, Catharine, daughter of David Schuyler, who, with his brother Pieterse, came from Amsterdam in 1650, and settled at Fort Orange. David Schuyler, the younger of the two, married

Abeel and Allied Families

Recent discoveries relating to the Abeel family, of which little has hitherto been known, have brought to light certain facts which have an important bearing on the Revolutionary period of our country’s history. The Genealogy of the Williamson and Abeel families, compiled by James A.Williamson, proves conclusively that the famous “Cornplanter” of the Seneca Tribe of the Six Nations was a direct descendant of Christopher Janse Abeel, the founder of this old Holland family in America. The faithful mother, who so carefully provided for her son’s welfare, little dreamed of the influence that would be exerted by him and his

Willem Willemsen Genealogy

Willem Willemsen Willem Willemsen, the Long Island ancestor, was born in Holland in 1637, came to New Amsterdam in the ship Concorde in 1657, and settled at Gravesend, L.L., where his name appears on the tax list of 1683, and on the census of Gravesend in 1698. He took the oath of allegiance to England in 1687. In the allotment of lands, 1670, he drew lot 32, and received another portion in 1700. In his will dated Dec.1, 1721, recorded in the surrogate’s office, New York (p. 288, liber 9), and other contemporaneous documents he signs his name Willem Willemsen.