Location: Rowan County NC

Memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom

I will here present to the reader the memoirs of Nathaniel Folsom the oldest of the three brothers who cast their lot in their morning” of life among” the Choctaws, and became the fathers of the Folsom House in the Choctaw Nation, as related by himself to the missionary, Rev. Cyrus Byington, June, 1823, and furnished me by his grand-daughter Czarena Folsom, now Mrs. Rabb. “I was born in North Carolina, Rowan County, May 17th, 1756. My father was born in Massachusetts or Connecticut. My mother was born in New Jersey. My parents moved to Georgia, and there my father

John Alexander – Descendants

The Genealogy of the Alexander family, into which Robert Love, commonly known as “Carter Bob”(my Father-F.D. Love) married, having married Sarah Matilda Alexander, May 25th, 1848, Alexanders —- John Alexander, was born in Rowan County, North Carolina, where he married Rachel Davidson (a first cousin of General William Davidson, who in the War of the Revolution was killed at Cowan’s Ford of the Catawba River in resisting the passage of Cornwallis), daughter of John Davidson. John Alexander removed from Rowan County to Lincoln County, North Carolina; thence to Buncombe County, (the Burke County) North Carolina (one of its first settlers);

Slave Narrative of Charley Watson

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Charley Watson Location: South Carolina Age: 87 “Dis is a mighty hot day I tells you, and after climbing them steps I just got to fan myself befo’ I give answer to your questions. You got any ‘bacco I could chaw and a place to spit? Dis old darkie maybe answer more better if he be allowed to be placed lak dat at de beginnin’ of de ‘sperience. “Where was I born? Why right dere on de Hog Fork Place, thought everybody knowed dat! It was de home place of my old Marster Daniel

Biography of Richmond Pearson

Richmond Pearson, late of Davie county when a part of Rowan, was born in Dinwiddie county, Va., in 1770, and at the age of nineteen years came to North Carolina and settled in the forks of the Yadkin river. When the war of the Revolution broke out he was a Lieutenant in Captain Bryan’s company (afterward the celebrated Colonel Bryan, of Tory memory). After the Declaration of Independence, at the first muster which occurred, he requested some on whom he could rely to load their guns. When Captain Bryan came on the ground he ordered all the men into ranks.

Biography of Mrs. Elizabeth Steele

The long, arduous and eventful retreat of General Morgan through the Carolinas, after the battle of the Cowpens, and the eager pursuit of Cornwallis to overtake him, encumbered with more than five hundred prisoners, on his way to a place of safety in Virginia, affords many interesting incidents. General Greene having met Morgan on the eastern banks of the Catawba river, at Sherrill’s Ford, and directed his forward movements, proceeded to Salisbury, a little in advance of his forces. It had been slightly raining during the day, and his wet garments, appearance of exhaustion and dejection of spirits at the

Biography of Hon. Archibald Henderson

Hon. Archibald Henderson was born in Granville county, N.C., on the 7th of August, 1768; studied law with Judge Williams, his relative, and was pronounced by the late Judge Murphy, who knew him long and well, to be “the most perfect model of a lawyer that our bar has produced.” … No man could look upon him without pronouncing him one of the great men of the age. The impress of greatness was upon his countenance; not that greatness which is the offspring of any single talent or moral quality, but a greatness which is made up by blending the

Biography of General Griffith Rutherford

General Griffith Rutherford was an Irishman by birth, brave and patriotic, but uncultivated in mind and manners. He resided west of Salisbury, in the Locke settlement, and actively participated in the internal government of the county, associated with such early and distinguished patriots as Moses Winslow, Alexander Osborn, Samuel Young, John Brevard, James Brandon, William Sharpe, Francis McCorkle, and others. He represented Rowan county in the Provincial Congress which met at Halifax on the 4th of April, 1776, and during this session he received the appointment of Brigadier General of the “Salisbury District.” Near the close of the summer of

J. C. Austin

Cook, 15th Co., Infantry. Son of J. H. and M. M. Austin. Husband of L. A. Austin, of Rowan County. Entered service June 6, 1918, at Concord, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Was mustered out of service at Camp Sevier, S. C., November 30th, 1918.

G. B. Weaver

Private 1st Class, Co. C, 81st Div., 306th F Signal; of Rowan County; son of W. A. and Mrs. S. A. Weaver. Husband of Mrs. Nealie L. Weaver. Entered service May 29, 1917, at Salisbury, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C., then to Camp Mills, L. I., N. Y. Mustered out at Camp Merritt, N. J., Nov. 10, 1919.

Gentery Weant

Private, Engrs., Co. E, 30th Div., 105th Regt.; of Rowan County; son of J. H. and Mrs. Cora Weant. Husband of Mrs. Eva Weant. Entered service March 30, 1918, at High Point, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C., to Camp Mills. Sailed for France; landed July 2, 1918. Voormizelle, Belgium, Sept. 1st; Bellicourt Sept. 29th; La Selle River; Mazinghein, France, Oct. 17th to 20th. Returned to USA April 19, 1919; landed at Charleston, S. C. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 24, 1919.