Location: Rockingham County NC

Adolphus E. Martin

Private M. G. Btn., Co. D, 57th, 19th Div.; of Rockingham County; son of J. B. and Mrs. Fannie Martin. Entered service July 24, 1918, at High Point, N.C. Sent to Camp Hancock, Ga. Transferred to Camp Dodge, Iowa. Mustered out at Camp Wadsworth, S. C., Feb. 7, 1919.

Grover Monroe Hooker

Gunner’s Mate, 1st Class. Son of G. R. and R. A. Hooker, of Stoneville, N.C. Husband of Fannie B. Hooker. Entered service December 7, 1915, at El Paso, Texas. Went to training station, San Francisco, Cal. On the U. S. S. Maryland, U. S. S. South Dakota, U. S. Naval Base 17 and 18, U. S. S. Eagle 56, R. S. Portsmouth, N. H. Three trips on convoy. Was stationed overseas one year. Stationed around South American coast 11 months. Prior to enlistment in Navy, served in the U. S. Army, stationed at the Philippines, September 24, 1912, to September

George R. Hooker

1st Class Private, Co. B, 42nd Div., 117th T. H. and M. P. Son of G. R. and R. A. Hooker, of Stoneville, N.C. Husband of Ollie Stafford Hooker. Entered service April 24, 1917, at Lynchburg, Va. Was sent to Ft. Monroe, Va.; transferred to Camp Elberta, Ill., then to Long Island, N. Y. Sent overseas Jan. 23, 1918; landed Feb. 2, 1918. Operations in Loneville Sector, in Baccerest, St. Clement, Champagne-Marne Defensive, Aisne Marne Offensive, St. Mihiel; operations between Meuse and Mozelle, Meuse-Argonne offensive; was through Germany four months. Two citations; gold chevrons Jan. 23, 1919. Landed in USA

A. L. Gammon

Water Tender (Navy); of Rockingham County; son of B. F. and Mrs. Elizabeth Gammon. Entered service Feb. 12, 1917, at Richmond, Va. Sent to Hampton Roads, Va.; transferred to battleship “New Hampshire;” six trips across on battleship “New Hampshire.” Served on board same ship until discharged. Mustered out at Hampton Roads, Va., Aug. 21, 1919.

Clyde H. Gentry

Private., Batry. E, 81st Div., 317th F. Artly.; son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Gentry; of Rockingham County. Entered service April 1, 1918, at Madison, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 8, 1918. Returned to USA June 8, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 8, 1919.

J. Roy Turner

Private, Supply Tr., Co. C, 81st Div., 306th Reg. Born in Rockingham County; son of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Turner. Husband of Mrs. Sallie Dixon Turner. Entered the service May 29, 1918, at Reidsville, N.C.  Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Sevier, from there to Camp Mills. Went to France Aug. 5, 1918. Fought at Verdun, Meuse-Argonne, St. Die. Returned to USA June 24, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., July 9, 1919.

C. L. Cox

Private, Co. A, 6th Div., 6th Am. Tr.; of Rockingham County; son of Rufus and Fannie Cox. Entered service May 9, 1918, at Leakesville, N.C. Sent to Ft. Scrivens, Ga. Transferred to Camp Wadsworth, S. C., to Camp Mills, N. Y. Sailed for France July 3, 1918. Landed in USA Jan. 19, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., Feb. 6, 1919.

George A. Cox

Mechanic, C. A. C., 6th Co.; of Rockingham County; son of Rufus and Fannie Cox. Entered service July 25, 1917, at Leakesville, N.C. Sent to Ft. Monroe, Va. Promoted to Rank as Mechanic Sept., 1917. Was transferred to Btry. F, 41st Railroad Artillery Oct. 10, 1918. Mustered out at Ft. Monroe, Va., Dec. 7, 1918.

W. B. Case

Pvt. Pioneer Inf., Co. B, 4th Reg.; of Rockingham County; son of M. L. and Murtha Case. Husband of Mrs. Irene Martin Case. Entered service Aug. 5th at Mayodan, N.C. Sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C. Transferred to Camp Stuart, Va. Sailed for France Sept. 23, 1918. Returned to USA July 1, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., July 7, 1919.

The Sara Indians

While we know nothing positively as to the linguistic affinity of the Sara, all the evidence goes to show that, like most of the tribes of the central region of Virginia and Carolina, they were of Siouan stock. Their name is probably from the Catawba word sara, signifying a place of “tall grass or weeds” (Gatschet). While the Siouan tribes treated in the foregoing consolidated, after their decline, and joined the Iroquois in the north, most of the remaining people of that stock, including the Sara, migrated southward and merged with the Catawba tribe in South Carolina. The history of