Location: Riley County KS

Biography of David Henry Edelblute

Among the old established families still numerously and worthily represented in Riley County, is that of Edelblute. Almost sixty years have passed since its founder selected a tract of virgin land in the valley of Wild Cat Creek, built his cabin there, reared his family and passed the rest of an industrious and contented life. The owner of the old Edelblute homestead is David Henry Edelblute, a highly respected citizen of this county and at present a resident of the Village of Keats. David Henry Edelblute was born in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, August 4, 1843. His parents were David and

Biography of Leslie V. Johnson

With all the progressiveness and enterprise of the native Kansan, Leslie V. Johnson had made his years in this state count chiefly as a banker, and for many years had found a large opportunity to serve the public through his post as cashier of the State Bank of Randolph in Riley County. As in the case with many successful business men and financiers, he had the atmosphere of a farm during his youth. He was born on his father’s farm in Pottawatomie County, October 8, 1872, and his earliest recollections are associated with that rural district. As a boy he

Biography of William David Ayars

No single township in Riley County, Kansas, is so favored as to have within its bounds all the county’s solid, dependable men, but that Wild Cat Township had its full share cannot be questioned. One of these is William David Ayars, a prosperous farmer and stockraiser and a large landowner, and additionally one of the township’s most popular citizens. William David Ayars was born August 17, 1850, in Grant County, Wisconsin, a son of Jeptha and Margaret (Thomas) Ayars. His father was born in New Jersey, perhaps of Holland ancestry, and remained in his native state until he was twenty

Biography of Delmar E. Deputy

Long a prominent citizen of Riley County and a successful business man of Manhattan, Delmar E. Deputy, in his capacity of private citizen and as a member of the firm of Deputy & Schellenbaum, publishers of the Manhattan Nationalist, had done much to advance the welfare of his city and county. He was born in Jennings County, Indiana, November 9, 1862, a son of Silvester F. and Jane (Fowler) Deputy, natives also of Jennings County, and descendants of old Virginia ancestors, and with his parents came to Kansas in 1878 and settled in Riley County, where the father became a

Biography of William Leslie Porter

A public office is only an opportunity for rendering real service to the public. Whether that opportunity is utilized depends upon the man. Several years ago the people of Topeka elected William Leslie Porter commissioner of parks and public properties. When he entered office he was new to the duties, and he was practically without political experience. But he had exhibited other qualities far more important that political experience. He had a well defined ambition to do everything he could for the community welfare through the opportunity afforded by his office. Mr. Porter also had a reputation of having a

Biography of Ralph Ray Price

Ralph Ray Price, professor of History and Civics in the Kansas State Agricultural College at manhattan, had a more than professional interest in the history of Kansas, since he is a native of the state and his people were factors in the pioneer life of the territory. Professor Price is of Scotch-Irish descent and one of his ancestors fought for American independenes in the Battle of Bunker Hill. He was born on a farm in Willow Springs Township of Douglas County, Kansas, ten miles south of Lawrence on March 6, 1872. For several years he had been out of the

Biography of Samuel McCloud McKeever Wood

Topeka, Kansas, had no more interesting personality among its citizens than Sam Wood, whe still coeupies the beautiful home he and his wife erected many years ago on the northeast corner of Tenth and Fillmore streets. This home is a landmark and spot of beauty in Topeka’s residential district. Mr. and Mrs. Wood personally supervised the eonstruction of the honse and the planning of the grounds. The site occupies six lots and wide, shady parks facing both Tenth and Fillmore streets. There are beautiful trees and shrubbery, and the entire place had that mellowness which is associated with old and

Biography of Charles Wilbur McCampbell

Associate professor of animal husbandry in the State Agricultural College at Manhattan and secretary of the State Livestock Registry Board whose offices are in the same city, Charles W. McCampbell is a native Kansan and for ten years had broadened and amplified his experience and authoritative knowledge of all phases of the livestock industry, not only with reference to Kansas but to the world at large. While he had perhaps rendered his greatest service as an instructor of the younger generation of Kansas farmers, some of his practical demonstration work and experiments have attracted national attention from livestock men. He

Biography of Christopher Columbus Michal

C. C. Michal, for the past fifteen years, had been one of the extensive contractors in Southern Kansas, though his work had been done in various parts of the state. His home and headquarters are at Independence, where he is recognized as one of the substantial citizens. Mr. Michal went to the border with the Kansas National Guards, Company K, Second Infantry, as a sergeant and served three months. His ancestors came originally from Ireland and were early settlers in the United States. They located very early in the nineteenth century in Western Indiana near Terre Hante, where Philip Michal,

Biography of J. W. Searson, Prof.

It is a laudable aim of educational institutions continually to bring solidity and scholarship to their teaching boards, thereby adding greatness to their organizations and at the same time making certain the wider diffusion of knowledge. The Kansas State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, Kansas, had pursued this course in the selection of its faculty, with the result that some of the ablest and most enlightened educators of the country devote their time and efforts to this progressive institution. Among these mention may be particularly made of Prof. J. W. Searson who, for the past six years, had occupied the chair