Location: Orange County NC

Slave Narrative of Tempie Herndon Durham

Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Tempie Herndon Durham Location: 1312 Pine St., Durham, North Carolina Age: 103 I was thirty-one years ole when de surrender come. Dat makes me sho nuff ole. Near ’bout a hundred an’ three years done passed over dis here white head of mine. I’se been here, I mean I’se been here. ‘Spects I’se de olest nigger in Durham. I’se been here so long dat I done forgot near ’bout as much as dese here new generation niggers knows or ever gwine know. My white fo’ks lived in Chatham County. Dey was Marse George an’ Mis’

Slave Narrative of Sarah Debro

Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Sarah Debro Location: Durham, North Carolina Age: 90 Years I was bawn in Orange County way back some time in de fifties. Mis Polly White Cain an’ Marse Docter Cain was my white folks. Marse Cain’s plantation joined Mistah Paul Cameron’s land. Marse Cain owned so many niggers dat he didn’ know his own slaves when he met dem in de road. Sometimes he would stop dem an’ say: ‘Whose niggers am you?’ Dey’d say, ‘We’s Marse Cain’s niggers.’ Den he would say, ‘I’se Marse Cain,’ and drive on. Marse Cain was good to his

Biography of Francis Lester Hawkes

The old saying, that North Carolina is a good place to start from, is the key-note to the greatness of her people, as well as a term of reproach as accepted by them. All great men must seek the large centers of civilization in order to give to the world their message, but the great principles of their lives come from the land of their birth. A State is to be measured by the number of its good and great men, and not by material or physical predominance. Even intellectual gifts and culture cannot make a people great, but may

Biographical Sketch of Anderson Cates

Anderson Cates (deceased) was born November 9, 1810, in Orange County, N. C. While young he had few opportunities for educating himself and when only ten years old he left his mother and went to Louisiana. After remaining there some years he lived alternately in Mississippi and Tennessee until 1836, when he came to what is now Lake County. In 1850 he married Susan Box, who was born November 19, 1827, in Decatur County, Tennessee, and they had six sons and three daughters; six of the children are now living. Mrs. Cates was a Methodist. Mr. Cates was a farmer,

Biography of Hon. Winfield Scott Pope

For many years Winfield Scott Pope was rated as one of the most highly respected residents and most prominent attorneys of Jefferson City. As lawyer and lawmaker he left the impress of his individuality upon the history of city and state when he was called to his final rest at the age of seventy-four years. He always held to the highest standards and ethics of the profession, his success being attributable at all times to his marked capability and merit. The story of his professional rise and progress is an interesting one. He was born in Davidson county, North Carolina,

Occaneechi Indians

Occaneechi Tribe: Meaning unknown. The Botshenins, or Patshenins, a band associated with the Saponi and Tutelo in Ontario, were perhaps identical with this tribe. Occaneechi Connections. The Occaneechi belonged to the Siouan linguistic stock; their closest connections were probably the Tutelo and Saponi. Occaneechi Location. On the middle and largest island in Roanoke River, just below the confluence of the Staunton and the Dan, near the site of Clarksville, Mecklenburg County, Va. (See also North Carolina.) Occaneechi History. Edward Blande and his companions heard of them in 1650. When first met by Lederer in 1670 at the spot above mentioned,

Eno Indians

Eno Tribe: Significance unknown, but Speck suggests i’nare, “to dislike,” whence “mean,” “comptemptible”; yeni’nare, “People disliked,”  Haynokes, synonym form Yardley (1645) Eno Connections. The Eno were probably of the Siouan linguistic stock, though, on account of certain peculiarities attributed to them, Mooney (1895) casts some doubt upon this. Their nearest relatives were the Shakori. Eno Location. On Eno River in the present Orange and Durham Counties. (See also South Carolina.) Eno Villages. The only village name recorded, distinct from that of the tribe, is Adshusheer, a town which they shared with the Shakori. It is located by Mooney (1928) near

Dozy H. Sykes

Private, Co. I, 106th Inf., 27th Div. Born in Orange County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Sykes. Entered the service at Hillsboro, N.C., Aug. 5, 1918. Was sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C., and from there to Newport News, Va. Sailed for France Sept. 15, 1918. Returned to USA March 6, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., April 4, 1919.

Joe A. Terrell

1st Class Private, 11th Cavalry. Born in Orange County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Terrell. Husband of Mrs. Mary Mae Terrell. Entered the service Dec. 5, 1912, at Columbus, Ohio. Was sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., and from there to Camp Stuart, Va. Served as Troop Instructor. Mustered out at Camp Stuart, Va., Dec. 18, 1918. Served in Colorado during the 1914 coal strike.

Bun Terrell

Private, 120th Inf., Co. I, 30th Div. Born in Orange County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jim Terrell. Entered service July 25, 1917, at Hillsboro, N.C. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., and from there to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 17, 1918. Fought at the Hindenburg Drive Sept. 29th. Returned to USA April 13, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 18, 1919.