Location: Kankakee Illinois

Biographical Sketch of E. D. Heinecke

E. D. Heinecke, grocer, was born in Washington, D. C., August 11, 1839; removed to Bucyrus, Ohio, at three years of age; in 1857 went to Van Wert, Ohio, where he clerked. Went from there to Kankakee, Ill., in 1859, and clerked for F. Samuel before entering the army, and after returning was again employed by Mr. Samuel as cashier in his store, until he commenced business himself in 1866. He was burned out in March 1871. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the United States army in Company F, Seventy-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry and was one of the sergeants

Biography of C. B. Goodrich

C. B. Goodrich. A life of quiet effectiveness, marked by a record of many duties well done and many responsibilities faithfully fulfilled, was that of the late, C. B. Goodrich, who died in Lawrence in 1910 at the age of sixty-six. He was one of those quiet unassuming men, rarely known to the world in general, but worthily filling the niche in the affairs of life allotted to them. Of Canadian nativity, born at Sarnia, he was brought to the United States when very young and was reared in and about Kankakee, Illinois. The first service in his quiet routine

Biography of Hon. William F. Keady

HON. WM. F. KEADY. – “The pen is mightier than the sword;” and the editor is greater than the captain. He is not simply a gossip and talker, but a thinker. The man who has grown up in a newspaper office can make his way in the world wherever a way is possible, and becomes a pillar in society. This is the case with Mr. Keady, who was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1821. He learned the printer’s trade, and entered the printing office of the Iroquois Journal at Middleport, Illinois, in 1852. Within six months he was half

Biographical Sketch of T.V.E. Sweet

T. V. E. Sweet, was a native of the city of Freeport, where he was born August 3, 1849. He derived his education from the public schools of the city, and in the more advanced branches of learning from the Northwestern University at Evanston, where he was a student two years. He worked at the printing trade until 1870, and in 1875 entered upon that clerical career in in which he has accomplished so much good, as a local preacher in the Rock River conference. His first religious work was at Thompson, ‘Illinois. At Shirland he was local supply, and