Location: Greene County NC

Tuscarora Indians

Tuscarora Tribe, Tuscarora Confederacy: From their own name Skǎ-ru’-rěn, signifying according to Hewitt (in Hodge, 1910), “hemp gatherers,” and applied on account of the great use they made of Apocynum cannabinum. Also called: Ă-ko-t’ǎs’-kǎ-to’-rěn Mohawk name. Ani’-Skǎlǎ’lǐ, Cherokee name. Ă-t’ǎs-kǎ-lo’-lěn, Oneida name. Tewohomomy (or Keew-ahomomy), Saponi name. Tuscarora Connections. The Tuscarora belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family. Tuscarora Location. On the Roanoke, Tar, Pamlico, and Neuse Rivers. (See also Pennsylvania and New York.) Tuscarora Subdivisions. The Tuscarora should be considered a confederacy with three tribes or a tribe with three subtribes as follows: Kǎ’tě’nu’ā’kā’, “People of the submerged pine tree”;

Woccon Indians

Woccon Tribe: Significance unknown. Woccon Connections. The Woccon belonged to the Siouan linguistic stock, their closest relations being the Catawba. Woccon Location. Between Neuse River and one of its affluents, perhaps about the present Goldsboro, Wayne County. Woccon Villages Tooptatmeer, supposed to have been in Greene County. Yupwauremau, supposed to have been in Greene County. Woccon History.-The first mention of the Woccon appears to be by Lawson writing about 1701, who recorded 150 words of their language. These show that it was nearer Catawba than any other known variety of speech. Lack of any earlier mention of such a large tribe

Guy V. Lassiter

Corpl., Supply Tr., Co. F, 105th Regt., 30th Div. Born in Greene County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Lassiter. Husband of Genivieve Lassiter. Entered service Sept. 28, 1917, at Snow Hill, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson; transferred to Camp Sevier. Sailed for France May 11, 1918. Returned to USA April 11, 1919, and was mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 14, 1919.

Jesse F. Harper, Jr.

Sergt., Inf., Co. F, 81st Div., 322nd Regt. Born in Greene County May 19, 1893; son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Harper. Entered service Sept. 7, 1917, at Snow Hill, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., from there to Camp Sevier Oct., 1918. Sailed for France Aug. 20, 1918. Fought in all engagements of 81st Div. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 26, 1919.

The Woccon, Sissipahaw, Cape Fear, and Warren-Nuncock Indians

Of the North Carolina tribes bearing the foregoing names almost nothing is known, and of the last two even the proper names have not been recorded. The Woccon were Siouan; the Saxapahaw and Cape Fear Indians presumably were Siouan, as indicated from their associations and alliances with known Siouan tribes, while the Warren-nuncock were probably some people better known under another name, though they cannot be identified. The region between the Yadkin and the Neuse, extending down to the coast, was probably occupied by still other tribes whose very names are forgotten. They were virtually exterminated by smallpox and other

Greene County, North Carolina Cemetery Transcriptions

North Carolina Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the North Carolina county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Greene County, North Carolina Tombstone Transcription Project) Aldridge Cemetery Bailey-Mercer Cemetery Barfied-Harrison Cemetery Beaman Cemetery Beaman-Craft Cemetery Brand-Brann Cemetery Burch Cemetery Carr Cemetery Cox Cemetery Andrew Craft Cemetery Darden-Cooley-Speight Cemetery Dawson Cemetery Dildy-Beamon Cemetery Fields Cemetery #1 Fields Cemetery #2 Gay Cemetery Gay-Slater Cemetery Harrel’s Chapel Cemetery Harrison Cemetery #1 Harrison Cemetery #2