Location: Frederick County MD

Governor Houston’s Life Among the Indians

The year following his failure to secure the contract, Houston spent writing letters defending his acts and denouncing the officials who had been discharged. In addition to the Indian officials, he poured his wrath and denunciation on Colonel Hugh Love, a trader on the Verdigris whom Houston accused of being in league with the Indian Agent to rob the Creeks; Love replied to Houston with some spirited charges against the latter. Stung by the contents of an article appearing in a Nashville paper, in a burst of passion Houston gave to the press of Nashville a most intemperate letter, July 13, 1831, beginning:

Earliest Records of All Saints’ Parish Frederick, Maryland, 1727-1781

* “These will probably seem meager and incomplete, but they are an exact and complete copy of the only records All Saints’ has for the period covered”-Emest Helfenstein. Barnhart, Benjamin m Rachael Wood, daughter of Joseph and Catharine Wood, April 3, 1773. Biggs, Benjamin m Hennaratta Prudence Deborah Margaretta Munday, daughter of Henry Munday, Sept. 26, 1745. Burroughs, John m Priscilla Rue, Mch. 17, 1760. Bushelle, Elizabeth daughter of Samuel Bushelle and Allatha his wife, Buried April 6, 1743. Byer, John m Ann Arnold April 3, 1743 Carmack, William and Jane. Children: Cornelius, b June 18, 1736. William, b Nov.

Slave Narrative of Menellis Gassaway

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Menellis Gassaway Date of Interview: Sept. 1937 Location: M.E. Home, Carrollton Ave., Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Carroll County MD Date of Birth: 1850 or 52 Reference: Personal interview with Menellis Gassaway, ex-slave, on Sept. 22, 1937, at M.E. Home, Carrollton Ave., Baltimore. “My name is Menellis Gassaway, son of Owing and Annabel Gassaway. I was born in Freedom District, Carroll County, about 1850 or 52, brother of Henrietta, Menila and Villa. Our father and mother lived in Carroll County near Eldersberg in a stone and log cabin, consisting of two rooms, one up and one

Slave Narrative of George Jones

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: George Jones Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Frederick County, Maryland Date of Birth: 1853 Age: 84 Place of Residence: 207 Aisquith St., Baltimore Md. Reference: Personal interview with George Jones, Ex-slave, at African M.E. Home, 207 Aisquith St., Baltimore. “I was born in Frederick County, Maryland, 84 years ago or 1853. My father’s name was Henry and mother’s Jane; brothers Dave, Joe, Henry, John and sisters Annie and Josephine. I know my father and mother were slaves, but I do not recall to whom they belonged. I remember my grandparents. “My father used to tell

Slave Narrative of James Wiggins

Person Interviewed: James Wiggins Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Anne Arundel County MD Date of Birth: 1850-1851 Place of Residence: 625 Barre St. Reference: Personal interview with James Wiggins, ex-slave, at his home, 625 Barre St. “I was born in Anne Arundel County, on a farm near West River about 1850 or 1851, I do not know which. I do not know my father or mother. Peter Brooks, one of the oldest colored men in the county, told me that my father’s name was Wiggins. He said that he was one of the Revells’ slaves. He acquired my father

Biography of Edward C. Simmons

Edward C. Simmons had passed the eightieth milestone when he was called from his activities to the world beyond. His career had indeed been a most active and useful one. He was numbered among those men to whom St. Louis attributes her development and her greatness. He entered the commercial circles of the city when a lad of sixteen years as an apprentice to the hardware trade in the store of Child, Pratt & Company on Main street, near Vine. From that time until his death his course was marked by a steady progression that ultimately gave him world leadership

Biographical Sketch of Thomas S. Grasselli

Grasselli, Thomas S.; manufacturer; born, Cleveland, Nov. 14, 1875; son of C. A. and Johanna Ireland Grasselli; educated, Mt. St. Mary’s College, Emmitsburg, Md.; married, Rock Island, Ill., May 29, 1899, to Emilie Schmidt; issue, three boys; entered Troop A, O. N. G., 1893; appointed capt. and quartermaster First Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, May, 1898; resigned to accept appointment as captain and quartermaster U. S. V., and resigned after conclusion of war with Spain; engaged with Grasselli Chemical Co. in 1893; now first vice pres.; director Citizens Savings & Trust Co., Bank of Commerce, National Ass’n, Woodland Ave. Savings & Trust

Maryland Cemetery Records, Frederick to Montgomery Counties

Maryland Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Maryland county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Frederick County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Frederick County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Beaver Dam German Baptist Cemetery Benton Family Cemetery Bush Creek German Brethren Church Cemetery Catholic Church Cemetery Central Chapel United Methodist Church Cronise-Fundenburg Family Cemetery Elias Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery German Reformed Church Cemetery , aka St James Reformed Church Glade Reformed Cemetery Graceham Moravian Cemetery Grossnickle Church

Biography of Dr. Rodney Glisan

DR. RODNEY GLISAN. – Doctor Glisan is one of the few men of our state who have been original and productive in the literary field. His main works have been of a very substantial character, and upon recondite professional subjects, and have not, therefore, been brought to the notice of the general reader. But to those versed in the periodicals and literature of medicine he bears a name and reputation second to few in our national union. Essays, lectures and other emanations of his pen are to be met with in the leading medical journals. An extensive original treatise prepared

Biography of Rodney Glisan, M.D.

Rodney Glisan, physician of Portland, son of Samuel and Eliza Glisan, was born at Linganore, Frederick County, Maryland, January 29, 1827. His ancestors were among the first English settlers of Maryland. He was graduated in the medical department of the University of Maryland, in 1849, and after passing a severe competitive examination before a medical board, was appointed a medical officer of the United States Army, in May, 1850. Having served in this capacity for about eleven years on the plains, and in Oregon during her Indian wars, he resigned his commission and settled in Portland, where he has ever