Location: Fauquier County VA

Biographical Sketch of Daniel Pegram

The parents of Daniel Pegram were Scotch. Daniel was born in Petersburg, Va., but settled and lived in Bedford County, where he raised ten children, six sons and four daughters, each of whom was more than six feet in height. Thomas, a son of Daniel Pegram, married Nancy Hopkins, whose mother’s maiden name was Clark, and who had a brother, Chester Clark,, who drew $100,000 in a lottery. Thomas had but three children James L., Edward T., and William. The latter died in Virginia in his 19th year. James L. married Julia R. Oley, of Virginia, and settled in St.

Biographical Sketch of George Farrow

The parents of George Farrow came from Scotland, and settled in Fauquier Co., Va., where George was born. He was a soldier of the war of 1812. He married a Miss Massey, and they had George, Jr., Nimrod, John, and Benjamin also two daughters. Benjamin married Lucy Smith, of Virginia, and they had John P., George, Mortimer, Joseph, Margaret, Sarah, Liney M., Mary L., and Amanda M. John P., Sarah, and Margaret came to Missouri. Sarah married William Browning, and settled in St. Charles County, but afterward removed to Lincoln County. Margaret married James B. Barton, and settled in St.

Biographical Sketch of John Hickerson

John Hickerson, of Fauquier Co., Va., married Elizabeth Baker, and their son, Thomas, came to Missouri in 1816, as teamster for John Ferguson, who settled in Darst’s Bot-tom. In 1818 Hickerson moved to Montgomery County and settled on the west bank of Loutre creek, near Loutre Lick. He soon after married Susan VanBibber, daughter of Major Isaac VanBibber, by whom he had thirteen children Melissa, Thomas A., James, Isaac V., Robert L., Alfouzo, and Susan J. The other six children died in infancy. Ezekiel Heckerson, a brother of Thomas, married Elizabeth Hayden, of Kentucky, and settled in Pike Co., Mo.,

Biography of Patrick H. Coney

In many ways the State of Kansas during the last half century had had no more interesting, patriotic, versatile figure than Patrick H. Coney of Topeka. He came to Kansas after making a brilliant record as a soldier in the Civil war. He had been extremely successful as a business man, and his interests as a business man have extended over a wide and diversified field. No man in the country had exhibited a more intense loyalty and devotion to the welfare of the veterans of the great struggle between the North and the South. Mr. Coney is a lawyer,

Slave Narrative of Kitty Hill

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Kitty Hill Location: 329 West South Street, Raleigh, North Carolina Age: 76-77 I tole you yisterday dat my age wus 76 years old, but my daughter come home, an’ I axed her’ bout it an’ she say I is 77 years old. I don’t know exactly the date but I wus born in April. I wus a little girl ’bout five years ole when de surrender come, but I don’t’ member anything much’ bout de Yankees. I wus born in Virginia, near Petersburg, an’ mother said de Yankees had been hanging’ round dere so

Biographical Sketch of Richard W. Blue

Richard W. Blue, a Union veteran of Virginia and a leading lawyer and judge of Kansas, finally advanced to the halis of Congress as a representative of his adopted state. He was born in Wood County, Virginia, September 8, 1841, and was raised on a mountain farm near the present city of Grafton. In 1859 he entered Monongalia Academy at Morgantown, Va., and remained at that institution several years, first as pupil and later as teacher, Subsequently he entered Washington College, Pennsylvania, and remained there until he enlisted in the Third West Virginia Infantry, at the opening of the Civil

Biography of William Proctor, M. D.

WILLIAM PROCTOR, M. D. (deceased), was a physician who always loved knowledge and as a physician was devoted to his profession, careful in his investigations and gave all the time he could find in his busy life to books and periodicals devoted to medicine and surgery. His range of information was broad, and during the many years he pursued the calling of AEsculapius he won a wide reputation and a large practice. He was born in Petersburg, Virginia, in 1826, and died January 10, 1890, when sixty-four years of age. He was a graduate of William and Mary College, of

Manahoac Indians

Manahoac Tribe: Meaning “They are very merry,” according to Tooker (1895), but this seems improbable. Also called: Mahocks, apparently a shortened form. Manahoac Connections. The Manaboac belonged to the Siouan linguistic family; their nearest connections were probably the Monacan, Moneton, and Tutelo. Manahoac Location. In northern Virginia between the falls of the rivers and the mountains east and west and the Potomac and North Anna Rivers north and south. Manahoac Subdivisions. Subtribes or tribes of the confederacy as far as known were the following: Hassinunga, on the headwaters of the Rappahannock River. Manahoac proper, according to Jefferson (1801), in Stafford

Biographical Sketch of W. H. Kirkland

W. H. Kirkland, who raised the first American flag in 1856 in the town of Tucson, was born in Petersburg, Virginia, July 12th, 1832, and emigrated to Arizona shortly after the Gadsden Purchase, eight or nine years before the organization of the Territory. He and his wife were the first white couple married in Arizona, being married in Tucson May 26th, 1860. In 1863 and 1864, he spent a good deal of time around Walnut Grove mining and ranching, about which time he purchased the ranch located by Pauline Weaver, and there engaged in stock raising. Later he settled in