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Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biographical Sketch of Charles A. Ricks

Ricks, Charles A.; sec’y and treas. Kuhlman Car Co.; born, Knoxville, Tenn., Aug. 14, 1868; son of Augustus J. and Emma Maxwell Atwater Ricks; educated, Kenyon Military Academy, and Kenyon College; married, Oct. 21, 1897, at Detroit, Mich., Miss Margaret Trowbridge; business career, 1888 clerk First National Bank, Massillon, O., sec’y and treas. Massillon Loan …

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Hough Family of New Bedford, Massachusetts

The progenitor in New England of those bearing the family name of Hough was William Hough, son of Edward Hough, of Westchester, in Cheshire, England. This William Hough was known as a house carpenter at Gloucester, Mass., along just prior to the middle of the seventeenth century. He lived at Trynall Cove, where and on Biskie island, opposite, he had land. It is not known that his father came to New England, but it is believed by those who have written of the family that Ann Hough, who died at Gloucester in 1672, aged eighty-five years, was Edward’s widow and the mother of William Hough. The latter was selectman in 1649 and 1650. His departure from Gloucester is spoken of in the latter year, when he joined the migration to New London, Conn., and in that State the family is a numerous one. William Hough married Oct. 28, 1645, Sarah, daughter of Hugh Calkins, and of their ten children the first three were born at Gloucester and the others at New London.

Biographical Sketch of Tracy W. Guthrie

Guthrie, Tracy W.; manufacturer; born, Chicago, Ill., Feb. 2, 1866; son of Julius C. and Emily A. Tracy Guthrie; educated in Chicago public schools, Chickering Institute, Cincinnati, public schools in Detroit, Mich., and Elmira, N. Y.; married, New Rochelle, N. Y., Feb. 8, 1910, Settal Horn; pres. Continental Coal Co., Columbus, O., 1903-1904; pres. Republic …

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The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

Biographical Sketch of Edward Brush Finch

Finch, Edward Brush; dealer in motor cars; born, Holly, Mich., Oct. 17, 1873; son of Nathaniel A. and Mary Hadley Finch; educated University of Michigan; married, Detroit, Mich., January, 1900, May Pruegs; issue, Edward B., Jr., William Roberts; member Michigan Naval Reserves and Michigan State Militia; 1900-1906, sec’y and treas. Pungs-Finch Auto & Gas Engine …

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Biographical Sketch of Hal. H. Hill

Hill, Hal. H.; contracting engineer; born, Detroit, Mich., Feb. 9, 1875; son of Thomas W. and Harriette C. De La Hooke Hill; educated, Cornell University, class of 1897, mechanical engineer; early education, University School, Cleveland; contracting engineer The Erie City Iron Works, Erie, Pa.; member American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, Union, …

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Biographical Sketch of Myron Bond Vorce

Vorce, Myron Bond; pres. Vorce Engineering Co.; born, Cleveland, Aug. 14, 1871; son of Charles M. and Evelyn Cornelia Marshall Vorce; public school education; married, Detroit, Mich., 1903, Miss Ethel Ridgley Stearns; clerk in store; then went with a surveying party; became interested in engineering; studied along that line while in Tennessee; accepted position with …

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Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of …

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Early Exploration and Native Americans

De Soto and his band gave to the Choctaws at Moma Binah and the Chickasaws at Chikasahha their first lesson in the white man’s modus operandi to civilize and Christianize North American Indians; so has the same lesson been continued to be given to that unfortunate people by his white successors from that day to this, …

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