Location: Clark County KY

Biographical Sketch of Ezekiel McCarty

Ezekiel and Ira McCarty were sons of James McCarty and Jane Harding, of Virginia. They settled in Clark County, Kentucky, in 1806, where they lived and died. They had twelve sisters, all of whom married and settled in Kentucky. Ezekiel was a soldier of the war of 1812, and was in the battle known as Dudley’s Defeat. He married Elizabeth Sidebottom of Kentucky. Their children were Shelton A., Eli, James, Sally, George W., John W., Joseph K., and Alfred S. Mr. McCarty removed to Missouri and settled in Danville in 1836. He died in 1866, and his wife in 1873.

Biographical Sketch of Enoch Spry

Enoch Spry came to Missouri from Clark County, Kentucky, with Simon Griggs and Cornelius Howard, when he was fifteen years of age. He married Mary A Logan, the only sister of William, Alexander, Hugh and Henry Logan, and settled in Montgomery County in 1817. They had eight children. Soon after steamboats began to navigate the Missouri river, Mr. Spry, happening to be in the vicinity of the river one day, heard a boat blow its whistle, at which lie became very much frightened, and ran home. He told his neighbors that a panther had caught a man down on the

Biographical Sketch of John Wright

John Wright, of England, came to America and settled in Pittsylvania County, Va. He had four children John, William, Nancy, and another daughter. William married Isabella Thrailkill, of Virginia, and settled in Clark County, Ky. He served five years in the revolutionary war. He had twelve children, ten of whom lived to be grown, and were married. His first son, William, married Nancy Oliver, of Kentucky, and they had eleven children Harvey S., James T., William, Stephen, Isaac W., Elizabeth, Susan, Nancy, Emeline, Louisa, and Lucinda. Mr. Wright settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1824, on a place adjoining the

Montgomery Co., Ky

MONTGOMERY CO. (Gladys Robertson) In this community most of the slaves were kept on farms and each family was given a well constructed log house. They were fed by provisions given them by their white masters and they were plentiful. They were clothed by their masters. These clothes were made by the colored women under the direction and supervision of their mistress, the white woman cut the clothes for both men and women, and the colored women did the sewing of the garments. The men did the manual labor on the farm and the women the domestic. Each white woman

Clark Co., Ky

CLARK CO. (Mayme Nunnelley) The first records of Slaves in Clark County was given by a descendant of one of the members of the little band of resolute Revolutionary soldiers who had been comrades and mess mates throughout the long bloody war. These fifteen families, some from Virginia and others from Maryland, started westward in the early spring of 1783 for Kentucky. They bought with them some horses, a few cattle, thirty or forty slaves and a few necessary household articles. After many hardships and trials, borne heroically by both men and women, they halted on the banks of the

Slave Narrative of Peter Bruner

Interviewer: Evelyn McLemore Person Interviewed: Peter Bruner Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co. Date of Birth: 1845 ESTILL CO. (Evelyn McLemore) Story of Peter Bruner, a former slave: Peter Bruner, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co., in 1845. His master was John Bell Bruner, who at that time treated him fairly well. When Peter was 10 years of age his master brought him and his sister to Irvine. After arriving in Irvine, Peter’s master was very cruel to him. They got only cornbread, fat meat and water to eat. If his master’s

Biography of James R. Wills

James R. Wills. Special interest attaches to the career of James R. Wills of St. Joseph not only because of his long residence in that community but also for the fact that he is one of the honored survivors of the great struggle between the North and the South in the ’60s. Mr. Wills was one of the productive farmers of this county for fully forty years, and then turned over the heavier responsibilities to a younger generation and with his good wife, who has traveled by his side for over half a century, is enjoying the comforts of a

Biography of Charles G. Martin

Charles G. Martin is one of the pioneers of what is now Bingham county, Idaho, and has seen this entire section of the state develop from a wild region, whereon civilization had not set its stamp, into one of the finest and richest farming and stock-raising districts of the state. In the work of development and progress he has ever borne his part, and he takes a just pride in the county’s improvement, and deserves great credit for what he has done in its behalf. Mr. Martin was born in Clark county, Kentucky, November i6, 1847, and is a son

Indians of Kentucky

Indians of Kentucky: It is known that, while the present area of Kentucky was, at the earliest times, the theater of severe Indian conflicts, stratagems, and bloody battles, these efforts of fierce contending warriors were made by tribes, who, during all the historical period of our information, crossed the Ohio from the West. The fierce Shawnee and wily Delaware remained in the country but for short times. They landed at secret points, as hunters and warriors, and had no permanent residence within its boundaries. Such were the incessant bloody attacks and depredations made by these and their kindred tribes, both prior and subsequent