Location: Canonsburg Pennsylvania

Biography of James W. Ballantine

One of the foremost representatives of the mercantile interests of the Wood river valley is James W. Ballantine, of Bellevue. A native of Pennsylvania, he was born February 15, 1839, and in his life has manifested many of the sterling traits of his Scotch ancestry, who emigrated to the United States in 1825. His parents were Nathaniel and Sarah (Wallace) Ballantine, natives of Scotland, in which country they were reared and married. Crossing the Atlantic to America, they took up their residence near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, where the father engaged in merchandising. They were Presbyterians in their religious faith, and were

Biographical Sketch of Frank Adgate Quail

Quail, Frank Adgate; Henderson, Quail & Siddall; lawyers; born, Canonsburg, Pa., June 18, 1865; educated, public schools, and graduated Washburn College, Topeka, Kas., 1887, degree A. B.; University of Michigan, 1889, degree LL. B.; began practice in Cleveland the same year; January, 1895, entered the firm of Henderson & Quail; firm changed to Henderson, Quail & Siddall, in 1904, G. B. Siddall being added; director in a number of corporations doing business in Northern Ohio; member Union, Euclid, University, and Colonial Clubs, and Chamber of Commerce; Democrat.

Biography of William B. Sutton

William B. Sutton. Since he came to Kansas in 1887, as a rancher-lawyer, William B. Sutton has found all the opportunities that an ambitious man could crave for an active, earnest, useful and prosperous career. For many years he has lived in Kansas City, Kansas, and is one of the leading lawyers of that city. He was born in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, February 12, 1849, the seventh in a family of ten children born to James and Sarah (Stanborough) Sutton. His father was born in the same county of Pennsylvania in 1812, and died in 1870, while the mother was

Biography of Dr. N. G. Blalock

DR. N.G. BLALOCK. – Americans in general and those of the West in particular have no equals in the world in versatility. No other people can do so many different things and do them so well as we. No other people so disregard the conventional and regular ways of doing things, and go across lots to conclusions and results so promptly. On our Western border is this especially manifest. Face to face with nature in some of her most remarkable and powerful manifestations, with all things new and untried, we burgeon out our powers untrammeled by custom or artificial restraints.