Location: Bourbon County KY

An Artists rendition of James Smith

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biographical Sketch of S. B. Guthery

S. B. Guthery was born in Pike county, Ohio, October 27, 1817. His grandfather was a colonel in the Revolutionary War, and in 1800 immigrated to the then far West – now the State of Ohio. When our subject was a boy he was employed by William Parmer, of Bourbon county, Kentucky; in keeping training and running fast horses. In 1837 he turned his attention to farming and has followed that business ever since, together with handling stock; with the exception of a short time he was engaged in grading on the Portsmouth & Columbus turnpike in 1840, and conducted

Biography of John Davis

John Davis, of Jonesburg, familiarly known as “Uncle John,” is the oldest son of the late Thomas Davis, of Shenandoah Co., Va. John was born October 30, 1791, in Shenandoah County, and is now nearly 85 years of age. When he was about sixteen his parents removed to Bourbon Co., Ky., and when the war of 1812 began, he enlisted in the army and served under Generals Winchester and Payne. He was stationed at Forts Wayne and Laramie, in Ohio, for some time. In 1820 he came to Missouri, and stopped a short time in St. Louis, which then had

Biographical Sketch of Major Thomas Hughes

Major Thomas Hughes, of Bourbon County, Kentucky, married Lucy Tandy, and their children were William, Gabriel, Thomas, Henry C., Elliott M., James and Susan T. The Major’s first wife died, and he subsequently married her sister, who was a widow at the time. Major Hughes held the position of Justice of the Peace, in Paris, for forty years, and all his decisions were sustained by the higher courts. He also represented Bourbon County in the Kentucky Legislature. His eldest son, William, married his cousin, Margaret Hughes, and settled in Boone County, Missouri. Elliott M. received a classical education, and came

Biography of George C. Diestilhorst

George C. Diestilhorst was born in Poile, Hanover, Germany, April 18, 1813, and was there reared to manhood. He received his education in the Lutheran school, of his native place, and his father being a harness-maker by trade, on leaving school he also learned that trade and worked with his father up to the time he was twenty-three years of age, when he emigrated to America, arriving in New York City, May 1, 1836. He was successful in securing a situation in the government harness manufactory in that city, and remained six months, then went on a prospecting tour, seeking

Slave Narrative of Harriet Mason

Interviewer: Sue Higgins Person Interviewed: Harriet Mason Location: Garrard County, Kentucky Age: 100 Story of Aunt Harriet Mason age 100-a slave girl: “When I was seven years old my missis took me to Bourbon County, when we got to Lexington I tried to run off and go back to Bryantsville to see my mammy. Mas’r Gano told me if I didn’t come the sheriff would git me. I never liked to go to Lexington since. “One Sunday we was going to a big meetin’ we heared som’in rattling in the weeds. It was a big snake, it made a track

Slave Narrative of Kisey McKimm

Interviewer: Betty Lugabill Person Interviewed: Kisey McKimm Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Bourbon County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1853 Age: 83 Betty Lugabill, Reporter [TR: also reported as Lugabell] Harold Pugh, Editor R.S. Drum, Supervisor Jun 9, 1937 Folklore: Ex-Slaves Paulding Co., District 10 KISEY McKIMM Ex-Slave, 83 years Ah was born in Bourbon county, sometime in 1853, in the state of Kaintucky where they raise fine horses and beautiful women. Me ‘n my Mammy, Liza ‘n Joe, all belonged to Marse Jacob Sandusky the richest man in de county. Pappy, he belonged to de Henry Young’s who owned de

Slave Narrative of George Conrad, Jr.

Person Interviewed: George Conrad, Jr. Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Connersville, Harrison County, Kentucky Date of Birth: February 23, 1860 Age: 77 I was born February 23, 1860 at Connersville, Harrison County, Kentucky. I was born and lived just 13 miles from Pariah. My mother’s name is Rachel Conrad, born at Bourbon County, Kentucky. My father, George Conrad, was born at Bourbon County Kentucky. My grandmother’s name is Sallie Amos, and grandfather’s name is Peter Amos. My grandfather, his old Master freed his and he bought my grandmother, Aunt Liza and Uncle Cy. He made the money by

Biography of Sidney Walter Moss

SIDNEY WALTER MOSS. – Mr. Moss is a venerable and noticeable character among the pioneers, not only for his long residence in Oregon, but for the esteem in which he has ever been held by the people. He has, in an eminent degree, that quality for which the early Oregonians have been remarkable, – liberality. He was born in Paris, Kentucky, March 17,1810. His father, Moses Moss, was a Baptist minister; and his mother, Katherine Buckford Moss, was a woman of great force and elevation of character. The young man learned the trade of stone-cutting, and in 1828 left Kentucky

Biography of James Quincy Thomas

James Quincy Thomas of Mahomet is now in his eighty-ninth year. It is a remarkable span of life which his years cover. He was born when Andrew Jackson was President of the United States. Not a permanent settlement had been fixed in Champaign County at the time of his birth. There were no railroads in America, no telegraph lines, very few canals, and none of the labor-saving devices which have transformed industry and social life. As a young man he swung the flail and the scythe in cutting and threshing grain, and not only actively experienced all the hardships of