Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek

Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, Article 14 History

This section of our website is being created for those who have searched in vain for their Mississippi Choctaw Ancestors.  Many knowledgeable people have contributed information to help you find these missing ancestors.  Because of the controversy of the Article 14 Claimants it may not be possible to establish tribal affiliation, but with the help …

Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, Article 14 History Read More »

Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek

This section of our website is being created for those who have searched in vain for their Mississippi Choctaw Ancestors. Many knowledgeable people have contributed information to help you find these missing ancestors. Because of the controversy of the Article 14 Claimants it may not be possible to establish tribal affiliation, but with the help of so many it may be possible to prove that your family was indeed Native American.

Mississippi Choctaw Claims

Statement of the delegates of the Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana Choctaw Council with reference to the following subjects: First the nature of their claims. Second the proposed legislation now pending before Congress. Third the need for relief. Fourth, the approval of their general contract.

Col. William Wards Register

Colonel William Ward was appointed United States agent to register Choctaw Indians according to Article 14 of the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, September 1830. The treaty was ratified February 24, 1831 and the six month time limit for those wishing to remain ended August 24, 1831. The registration procedure resulted in numerous “contingent claims” by members of the Choctaw Nation.

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