Topic: Oneida

1838 Oneida Indian Census

We, the undersigned Chiefs and Head Men of the Orchard Party of Oneida Indians residing at Green Bay, Wisconsin Territory, do hereby certify that the above and foregoing lists, is a just and true Census and enumeration of the number of persons belonging to said party, that is to say, Fifty-three (53) men, Fifty-two (52) women, and One hundred and one (101) children, making a total of Two hundred and six (206) souls, and that the same was taken by H. S. Baird, U. S. Commissioner, in open council, in our presence, at Duck Creek, on the 15th day of

Oneida and Cayuga join the Iroquois Confederacy

“The Oneida and Cayuga,” says Gallatin, “are said to have been compelled to join [the confederacy.] Those two tribes were the younger and the three others the older members.” Zinzendorf, speaking of the Iroquois, says “the Oneidas and Cayuga are their children.”–Indian tribes of North America. “By the early French writers, the Mohawks and Oneidas were styled the lower or inferior Iroquois; while the Onondagas, Cayuga and Seneca, were denominated the upper or superior Iroquois, because they were located near the sources of the St. Lawrence. The Mohawks, who are commonly supposed to be the first nation in the confederacy

Hiawatha Speaks to the Tribes

At length he regained his composure and took his seat in the council, whose deliberations were participated in by the ablest counselors of the assembled nations. At the conclusion of the debate, Hiawatha, desiring that nothing should be done hastily and inconsiderately, proposed that the council be postponed one day, so that they might weigh well the words which had been spoken, when he promised to communicate his plan for consideration, assuring them of his confidence in its success. The following day the council again assembled and amid breathless silence the sage counselor thus addressed them: “Friends and Brothers: You

Taounyawatha – Deity of the Forest

This was a part of the broad domain of the Iroquois 1Iroquois was the French name for the five confederated nations of Indians residing mostly within this State. By the Dutch they were called “Maquas.” They denominated themselves “Mingoes,” meaning United People – Clark’s Onondaga. Their true name is “Hodenosaunee” or “People of the Long House,” because the five nations were ranged in a long line through Central New York, and likened to one of their long bark houses. Parkman’s Jesuits. Ruttenber says they bore the title of “Aquinosbione,” or “Konosbioni,” having the same meaning. Confederacy,   which extended, in general

Oneida Indian Bands, Gens and Clans

Many tribes have sub-tribes, bands, gens, clans and phratry.  Often very little information is known or they no longer exist.  We have included them here to provide more information about the tribes. First Christian Party. A division of the Oneida at the period of the removal to Green bay, Wis., and afterward a Washington treaty (1828) in U. S. Ind. Treat., 621, 1873. First Christian Party Roll