Topic: Nez Perce

Inaspetsum Tribe

Inaspetsum Indians. One of the tribes included by the early fur traders under he term Nez Perce. They lived on Columbia River, above the mouth of the Snake, in Washington. Perhaps they were the Winatshipum or the Kalispel. (L. F.)

Nez Percé Indian War

Chief Joseph, took active measures of resistance of the treaty of 1855, and the Nez Percé war of 1877 resulted. This article is a brief history of that war.

Nez Perce Indian Research

Nez Percé Indians (‘pierced noses’) A term applied by the French to a number of tribes which practiced or were supposed to practice the custom of piercing the nose for the insertion of a piece of dentalium.  The term is now used exclusively to designate the main tribe of the Shahaptian family, who have not, however, so far as is known ever been given to the practice. Read more about the Nez Percé History. Nez Percé Indian Biography Nez Percé Indian Chiefs and Leaders Jackson Sundown Chief Joseph (hosted at Indigenous Peoples History) Chief Joseph – Leader of the Nez

Nez Perce Tribal Territory Map

Nez Percé Indian Chiefs and Leaders

The chiefs and leaders of the Nez Percé tribe that come down to us in history are the tales of two coins. They’re either known for their friendliness to the white race, who came to their land and conquered it away, or their known for their fierce battle skills as they viciously fought for their rights to hold their land. In the end, the names that follow and the biographies they reflect provide an illustrative look into the lives of the Nez Percé Indians.

Nez Perce Tribe

Nez Percé Indians (‘pierced noses’) A term applied by the French to a number of tribes which practiced or were supposed to practice the custom of piercing the nose for the insertion of a piece of dentalium. The term is now used exclusively to designate the main tribe of the Shahaptian family, who have not, however, so far as is known ever been given to the practice. Nez Percé History The Nez Percé or Sahaptin of later writers, the Chopuunish (corrupted from Tsútpěli) of Lewis and Clark, their discoverers, were found in 1805 occupying a large area in what is

The Epic of the Nez Percé

Xenophon has chronicled the retreat of the ten thousand; De Quinces has romanced about the migration of the Tartars; a thousand pens have recorded the annihilation of the Grand Army of Napoleon: the story of Joseph and his Nez Pierces is my theme – the story of the bitterest injustice toward a weak but independent people to which the United States ever set its hand. And at the outset let me confess that I am the advocates do the friend of the Indian, at least in this instance! In 1855, Governor Isaac I. Stevens of Washington Territory negotiated an equitable,

Retreat of the Indians under Cover of Night

The Indians claimed after their final surrender that they would have held Gibbon’s command in the timber longer than they did, and would have killed many more, if not all of them, had they not learned that Howard was at hand with reinforcements. They admit that they were warned of impending danger in some form in due time to have avoided a meeting with Gibbon, but did not heed it. They tell us that on the evening before the arrival of Gibbon’s troops at the Indian camp, a “medicine man ” had cautioned the chiefs that death was on their

Stealthy Midnight March

At 10 o’clock at night the officer of the guard spoke to the General in a whisper, and he arose with the alacrity of a youth who goes forth to engage in the sports of a holiday. The men were called at once, and in whispered orders the line of march was speedily formed. All were instructed to preserve the most profound silence from that moment until the signal should be given to open fire on the enemy, and, under the guidance of Joe Blodgett and Lieutenant Bradley, the little band filed silently down the winding trail, threading its way,

Map of Battle of the Big Hole

Battle of the Big Hole

A History of General Gibbon’s Engagement with Nez Perce Indians in the Big Hole Valley, Montana, August 1877… referred to as the Battle of the Big Hole. Includes a list of the American Soldier casualties.

Stubborn Resistance of the Indians in the Pine Woods

As soon as the command abandoned the camp, the Indians reoccupied it, and under the fire of the sharpshooters, hauled down several of their teepees, hastily bundled together the greater portion of their plunder, packed a number of horses with it, and, mounting their riding ponies, the squaws and children beat a hasty retreat down the valley, driving the herd of loose horses with them. They had hot work breaking camp, and several of them and their horses were killed while thus engaged. Two of Joseph’s wives and a daughter of Looking Glass were among the slain, who were believed