Topic: Chippewa

Treaty of August 2, 1855

Articles of agreement and convention, made and concluded at the city of Detroit, in the State of Michigan, this second day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, between George W. Manypenny and Henry C. Gilbert, commissioners on the part of the United States, and the Chippewa Indians of Saginaw, parties to the treaty of January 14, 1837, and that portion of the band of Chippewa Indians of Swan Creek and Black River, parties to the treaty of May 9, 1836, and now remaining in the State of Michigan. In view of the existing condition of the Indians aforesaid,

Treaty of April 7, 1866

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Washington, District of Columbia, this seventh day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-six, by and between the United States, party of the first part, by their commissioners, D. N. Cooley, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and E. E. L. Taylor, thereunto duly authorized, and the Bois Forte band of Chippewa Indians, parties of the second part, by the undersigned chiefs, head-men, and warriors of said bands, thereunto duly authorized. Article 1.The peace and friendship now existing between the United States and said Bois Forte bands

Treaty of February 7, 1839

Articles supplementary to certain treaties between the United States and the Saganaw tribes of Chippewa. Article 1. Whereas the said tribe have, by the treaty of the 14th January, 1837, ceded to the United States, all their reserves of land in the State of Michigan, on the principle of said reserves being sold at the public land offices for their benefit, and the actual proceeds being paid to them, as farther defined by stipulations contained in the amendments to said treaty of the 20th December 1837, and of the 23d January 1838. And whereas it is required by a subsequent

Treaty of January 23, 1838

Articles of a treaty concluded at the city of Saganaw in Michigan, on the twenty-third day of January eighteen hundred and thirty-eight, between the United States of America, by the undersigned commissioner, and the several bands of the Chippewa nation comprehended within the district of Saganaw. Whereas the chiefs of said bands have represented, that combinations of purchasers may be formed, at the sale of their lands for the purpose of keeping down the price thereof, both at the public and private sales, whereby the proceeds would be greatly diminished; and whereas, such a procedure would defeat some of the

Treaty of September 30, 1854

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at La Pointe, in the State of Wisconsin, between Henry C. Gilbert and David B. Herriman, commissioners on the part of the United States, and the Chippewa Indians of Lake Superior and the Mississippi, by their chiefs and head-men. Article 1. The Chippewas of Lake Superior hereby cede to the United States all the lands heretofore owned by them in common with the Chippewas of the Mississippi, lying east of the following boundary-line, to wit: Beginning at a point, where the east branch of Snake River crosses the southern boundary-line of the Chippewa

Treaty of November 17, 1807

Articles of a treaty made at Detroit, this seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and seven, by William Hull, governor of the territory of Michigan, and superintendent of Indian affairs, and sole commissioner of the United States, to conclude and sign a treaty or treaties, with the several nations of Indians, north west of the river Ohio, on the one part, and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors of the Ottoway, Chippeway, Wyandotte, and Pottawatamie nations of Indians, on the other part. To confirm and perpetuate the friendship, which happily subsists between the

Treaty of January 14, 1837

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Detroit, in the State of Michigan, on the fourteenth day of January, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and thirty-seven, between the United States of America by their commissioner, Henry R. Schoolcraft, and the Saganaw tribe of the Chippewa nation, by their chiefs and delegates, assembled in council. Article 1. The said tribe cede to the United States the following tracts of land, lying within the boundaries of Michigan; namely; One tract of eight thousand acres, on the river Au Sable. One tract of two thousand acres, on the Misho-wusk

Treaty of December 20, 1837 – Saginaw

Articles of a treaty, made and concluded at Flint river, in the State of Michigan, on the twentieth day of December, eighteen hundred and thirty-seven, between the United States, by Henry R. Schoolcraft commissioner duly authorized for that purpose, and acting superintendent of Indian affairs, and the Saganaw tribe of Chippewas. Article 1. It is agreed, that the sum of fifty cents per acre shall be retained out of every acre of land ceded by said tribe, by the treaty of the 14th of January 1837, as an indemnification for the location to be furnished for their future permanent residence

Treaty of December 20, 1837

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at St. Peters (the confluence of the St. Peters and Mississippi rivers) in the Territory of Wisconsin, between the United States of America, by their commissioner, Henry Dodge, Governor of said Territory, and the Chippewa nation of Indians, by their chiefs and headmen. Article 1. The said Chippewa nation cede to the United States all that tract of country included within the following boundaries: Beginning at the junction of the Crow Wing and Mississippi rivers, between twenty and thirty miles above where the Mississippi is crossed by the forty-sixth parallel of north latitude,

Treaty of May 9, 1836

Articles of a treaty made at Washington in the District of Columbia on the ninth day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-six, between Henry R. Schoolcraft, commissioner on the part of the United States and the chiefs of the Swan-creek and Black-river bands of the Chippewa nation, residing within the limits of Michigan. Whereas certain reservations of land were made to the said bands of Indians in the treaty concluded at Detroit on the 17th of November 1807, and these reservations after having been duly located, under the authority of the Government,