Topic: Chippewa

Treaty of August 19, 1825

Treaty with the Sioux and Chippewa, Sacs and Fox, Menominie, Ioway, Winnebago, and a portion of the Ottawa, and Potawattomie Tribes. The United States of America have seen with much regret, that wars have for many years been carried on between the Sioux and the Chippewas, and more recently between the confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes, and the Sioux; and also between the Ioways and Sioux; which, if not terminated, may extend to the other tribes, and involve the Indians upon the Missouri, the Mississippi, and the Lakes, in general hostilities. In order, therefore, to promote peace among these

Treaty of August 25, 1828

Articles of agreement with the Winnebago Tribe and the United Tribes of Potawatamie, Chippewa and Ottawa Indians. The Government of the United States having appointed Commissioners to treat with the Sac, Fox, Winebago, Potawatamie, Ottawa, and Chippewa, tribes of Indians, for the purpose of extinguishing their title to land within the State of Illinois, and the Territory of Michigan, situated between the Illinois river and the Lead Mines on Fever River, and in the vicinity of said Lead Mines, and for other purposes; and it having been found impracticable, in consequence of the lateness of the period when the instructions

Treaty of August 11, 1827

Treaty with the Chippewa, Menominee and Winnebago at the Butte des Morts on Fox River in the Territory of Michigan, August 11, 1827.

Treaty of August 5, 1826

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Font du Lac of Lake Superior, this fifth day of August, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six, between Lewis Cass and Thomas L. McKenney, Commissioners on the part of the United States, and the Chippewa Tribe of Indians. Whereas a Treaty was concluded at Prairie du Chien in August last, by which the war, which has been so long carried on, to their mutual distress, between the Chippewas and Sioux, was happily terminated by the intervention of the United States; and whereas, owing to the

Treaty of August 29, 1821

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at Chicago, in the State of Illinois, between Lewis Cass and Solomon Sibley, Commissioners of the United States, and the Ottawa, Chippewa, and Pottawatamie Nations of Indians. Article I. The Ottawa, Chippewa, and Pottawatamie, Nations of Indians cede to the United States all the Land comprehended within the following boundaries: Beginning at a point on the south bank of the river St. Joseph of Lake Michigan, near the Parc aux Vaches, due north from Rum’s Village, and running thence south to a line drawn due east from the southern extreme of Lake Michigan,

Treaty of July 6, 1820

Articles of a treaty, made and concluded at L’Arbre Croche and Michilimackinac, in the territory of Michigan, between the United States of America, by their Commissioner Lewis Cass, and the Ottawa and Chippewa nations of Indians. Article I. The Ottawa and Chippewa nations of Indians cede to the United States the Saint Martin Islands in Lake Huron, containing plaster of Paris, and to be located under the direction of the United States. Article II. The Ottawa and Chippewa nations of Indians acknowledge to have this day received a quantity of goods in full satisfaction of the above cession. Article III.

Treaty of September 17, 1818

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at St. Mary’s, in the state of Ohio, between Lewis Cass and Duncan McArthur, commissioners of the United States, with full power and authority to hold conferences, and conclude and sign a treaty or treaties, with all or any of the tribes or nations of Indians within the boundaries of the state of Ohio, of and concerning all matters interesting to the United States and the said nations of Indians, and the sachems, chiefs, and warriors, of the Wyandot, Seneca, Shawnese, and Ottawas, tribes of Indians; being supplementary to the treaty made and

Treaty of August 2, 1847

Articles of a treaty made and concluded at the Fond du Lac of Lake Superior, on the second day of August, in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, between the United States, by their commissioners, Issac A. Verplank and Henry M. Rice, and the Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior, by their chiefs and head-men. Article I. It is agreed that the peace and friendship which exists between the people of the United States and the Chippewa Indians shall be perpetual. Article II. The Chippewa Indians of the Mississippi and Lake Superior cede and sell to

Treaty of August 21, 1847

Article of a treaty made and concluded at Leech Lake on the twenty-first day of August, in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, between the United States, by their commissioners, Isaac A. Verplank and Henry M. Rice, and the Pillager Band of Chippewa Indians, by their chiefs, head-men, and warriors. Article I. It is agreed that the peace and friendship which exists between the United States and the Indians, parties to this treaty, shall be perpetual. Article II. The Pillager band of Chippewa Indians hereby sell and cede to the United States all the country within the following

Treaty of July 16, 1859

Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the Sac and Fox agency on this sixteenth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-nine, by David Crawford, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the following-named delegates representing the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewas and the Munsee or Christian Indians, they being duly authorized thereto by said Indians, viz: Eshton-quit, or Francis McCoonse, Edward McCoonse, William Turner, Antwine Gokey, Henry Donohue, Ignatius Caleb, and John Williams. Whereas the Swan Creek and Black River band of Chippewas, of Kansas Territory, who were parties to the treaty