Topic: Algonquian

Monacan Tribe

Monacan Indians (possibly from an Algonquian word signifying a digging stick or spade). A tribe and confederacy of Virginia in the 17th century. The confederacy occupied the upper waters of James river above the falls at Richmond. Their chief village was Rasawek. They were allies of the Manahoac and enemies of the Powhatan, and spoke a language different from that of either. They were finally incorporated with other remnants under the names of Saponi and Tutelo. The confederacy was composed of the Monacan proper, Massinacac, Mohemencho, Monahassano, Monasiccapano, and some other tribes. The Monacan proper had a chief settlement, known

Nipissing Tribe

Nipissing Indians, Nipissing Nation, Nipissing First Nation, Nipissing People (‘at the little water or lake’, referring to Lake Nipissing; Nipisirinien, ‘little-water people’). A tribe of the Algonkin. When they first became known to the French, in 1613, they were residing in the vicinity of Lake Nipissing, Ontario, which has been their home during most of the time to the present. Having been attacked, about 1650, by the Iroquois, and many of them slain, they fled for safety to Lake Nipigon 1Mackenzie, Voy., x1i, note, 1802 , where Allouez visited them in 1667, but they were again on Lake Nipissing in 1671. A

Noquet Tribe

Noquet Indians (No´ke, ‘bear foot’; another name for the Bear gens (see Noka) of the Chippewa. W. J.) An Algonquian tribe located by the earliest French writers about Noquet bay, at the mouth of Green Bay, extending north across the peninsula to Lake Superior.  In 1659 they were attached to the mission at St. Michel, together with the Menominee, Winnebago, and others. In 1761 Jefferys, probably on the authority of some recent French writer, says they were on the island at the mouth of Green Bay, formerly occupied by the Potawatomi.  They were never prominent as a tribe, and were

Ononchataronon Tribe

Ononchataronon Indians, Ononchataronon Nation, Ononchataronon First Nation, Ononchataronon People (Huron name). An Algonkin tribe or band that occupied the district near Montreal, Canada, between St Lawrence and Ottawa rivers, and wintered near the Hurons. In 1642 they were but a remnant. They claimed to have been the original occupants of Montreal Island and of a large territory on both sides of the St Lawrence. They said they had been conquered and dispersed by Hurons, who were then their enemies, and that the survivors of the war had taken refuge with the Abnaki or the Iroquois or had joined the Hurons. Hochelaga, the

Mohegan Tribe

Mohegan Indians (from maïngan, ‘wolf.’ Trumbull). An Algonquian tribe whose chief seat appears originally to have been on Thames river, Conn., in the north part of New London county. They claimed as their proper country all the territory watered by the Thames and its branches north to within 8 or 10 miles of the Massachusetts line, and by conquest a considerable area extending north and east into Massachusetts and Rhode Island, occupied by the Wabaquasset and Nipmuc. On the west their dominion extended along the coast to East river, near Guilford, Conn. After the destruction of the Pequot in 1637

Manahoac Tribe

Manahoac Indians (Algonquian: ‘they are very merry.’ – Tooker). A confederacy or group of small tribes or bands possibly Siouan, in north Virginia, in 1608, occupying the country from the falls of the rivers to the mountains and from the Potomac to North Anna river. They were at war with the Powhatan and Iroquois, and in alliance with the Monacan, but spoke a language different from any of their neighbors.  Among their tribes Smith mentions the Manahoac, Tanxnitania, Shackaconia, Ontponea, Tegninateo, Whonkenti, Stegaraki, and Hassinunga, and says there were others.  Jefferson confounded them with the Tuscarora.  Mahaskahod is the only

Matinecoc Tribe

Matinecoc Indians. An Algonquian tribe which formerly inhabited the northwest coast of Long Island, New York, from Newtown, Queens county, to Smithtown, Suffolk county. They had villages at Flushing, Glen Cove, Cold Spring, Huntington, and Cow Harbor, but even before the intrusion of the whites they had become greatly reduced, probably through wars with the Iroquois, to whom they paid tribute. In 1650 Secretary Van Tienhoven reported but 50 families left of this once important tribe. Ruttenber includes them in his Montauk group, which is about equivalent to Metoac; but the interrelationship of the tribes in the western part of

Mattabesec Tribe

Mattabesec Indians (from massa-sepuēs-et, ‘at a [relatively] great rivulet or brook. Trumbull). An important Algonquian tribe of Connecticut, formerly occupying both banks of Connecticut river from Wethersfield to Middletown or to the coast and extending westward indefinitely. The Wongunk, Pyquaug, and Montowese Indians were apart of this tribe. According to Ruttenber they were a part of the Wappinger, and perhaps occupied the original territory from which colonies went out to overrun the country as far as Hudson river. The same author says their jurisdiction extended over all south west Connecticut, including the Mahackeno, Uncowa, Paugusset, Wepawaug, Quinnipiac, Montowese, Sukiang, and