Location: Warren County MO

Biographical Sketch of Jesse Cain

Jesse Cain settled on Charrette creek, in now Warren County, about 1812. He joined Nathan Boone’s company of rangers, and served with them during the Indian war. He was an eccentric character, and generally managed to afford his associates a great deal of amusement. His children were Polly, Sally, Paulina, Vina, Jack, James, Jesse, Jr., Harvey, and Eli.

Biography of John Kennedy

John Kennedy and his wife, whose maiden name was Margaret Rowan, of Ireland, came to America and settled in Virginia many years before the revolution. They had eight children John, James, William, Thomas, George, Abraham, Margaret, and Jane. John was killed by the Indians while assisting to cut a road from Knoxville to Nashville, Tennessee. James settled in South Carolina, where he died. William was captured by the British, while serving in the continental army, and died on board one of their prison ships. George and Margaret were killed by the Indians, where Nashville, Tenn., now stands. Their mother died

Biographical Sketch of Jesse Caton

Jesse Caton, of Kentucky, settled near the present site of Marthasville, in Warren County, in 1811. He married a Miss Sparks, who was a sister of Henry Bryan’s wife, and their children were Noah, Jonas, Jesse, Jr., Elizabeth, Nancy, Jemima, Mahala, Rebecca, Fannie, and Hester. Noah married a Miss McDermid. Jesse, Jr., married Missouri Lamme. Elizabeth married John B. Callaway, son of Flanders Callaway. Nancy married Adam Zumwalt. Jemima and Mahala married John Carter. Rebecca married a Mr. McCutchen. Fannie married Daniel Gillis. Hester married a man in Southwest Missouri, but we could not obtain his name.

Biographical Sketch of William Clyce

William Clyce, of Virginia, was an early settler near Pinckney, in Warren County. He married Nancy Hart, and they had Milford, Elizabeth, and Preston. His first wife died, and he was married the second time to Polly Wyatt, by whom he had Nancy, Frank, William, Gabriella, and Thomas. Milford married in Kentucky, to Priscilla Williams. Elizabeth married and settled in Linn County, Missouri. Preston and Frank died single, in Kentucky. Nancy married a Mr. Swasey, of Canada, who settled at Pinckney, in Warren County, and opened a store. William married Christina Cheeseman, a German lady. Gabriella married Cunningham Parsons. Thomas

Biographical Sketch of John B. Callaway

John B. Callaway was the eldest son of Flanders Callaway and Jemima Boone.* He was a fine scribe and an excellent business man, and was Justice of the Peace and Judge of the County Court for many years. A large proportion of the old legal papers of St. Charles County have the name of John B. Callaway attached to them as Justice of the Peace. He had a mill and a distillery on Femme Osage creek, and the water for the distillery was carried some distance in troughs, made by hollowing out poles, which were kept free of mud by

Biographical Sketch of Louis Davis

Louis Davis, of England, came to America and settled in Virginia, prior to the revolution. He had one son, Louis, Jr., who married Agnes Walton, and they had nine children Lourena, Mary, Saluda, Sally, Jincia, Edna, Louis, Thompson, and John K., all of whom married and lived and died in Virginia. Isaac T., the second son of John K. Davis, married Martha Lang-ford, and settled in Warren County in 1835. They had five children.

Biographical Sketch of Charles Ellis

Charles Ellis, of Virginia, married his cousin, Nancy Ellis, and they had Thomas, Polly, Stephen, Elizabeth, Nancy, Charles, Joseph, Martha, James M., and Susan. Mr. Ellis removed from Richmond, Va., to Shelby Co., Ky., in 1815. Stephen married Mary Young, of Kentucky, and settled in Warren Co., Mo., in 1826. In 1847 he removed to St. Charles County, where he died. His children were James, Charles, Nancy, Sarah C., Martha F., Mary H., and William T. Joseph Ellis was married twice; first, to Nancy Netherton, by whom he had Henry C., Mildred C., Charles M., Ann E., Lucy B., Paulina,

Biography of Vincent Fines

Vincent Fines, of Germany, settled first in Pennsylvania, from whence he removed to Tennessee, where he was killed by the Indians. His children were Thomas, William, Abraham, Isaac, Phoebe, and Sally. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Fines married Rueben Bedford, by whom she had three children. Thomas married Mary Nave, of Tennessee, by whom he had Levi, Abraham, Sally, Delila and Amy. Mr. Fines was killed by an accidental discharge of his gun, and in 1817 his widow and “children came to Missouri. Abraham married Cynthia Harper, in 1819. The nearest Justice of the Peace was James Duncan,

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Andrew Fourt

Dr. Andrew Fourt was born in Maryland in 1780. When he was fourteen years of age his parents removed to Kentucky, where, in 1807, he married Sarah Wyatt. In 1810 he came to Missouri with his wife and two children, on pack horses, and settled near Charrette village in (now) Warren County. When the Indian war began he joined Capt. Callaway’s company of rangers, and served twelve months. When Montgomery County was organized, Dr. Fourt was appointed one of the commissioners to locate the county seat, and Pinckney, near the Missouri river, was chosen as the place. The Doctor subsequently

Biographical Sketch of David Howard

David Howard, of Mount Sterling, Ky., married first to Margaret Fourt, and settled on Charrette creek, in Warren County, 1819. His children were James, Peter, Thomas, Polly, John, and Jackson. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Howard married the widow McCutchen, whose maiden name was Rebecca Caton. By her he had Elizabeth, George, and Naoma. Mr. Howard was a great hunter and sugar maker, and made the best maple sugar in the country. He was also a zealous Methodist, and his name is prominently identified with the early history of that church in his county. His son, John