Location: Clark County KY

Clark County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Clark County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1792 Clark County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Clark County, Kentucky KYGenWeb 1792 Tax Roll 1800 Clark County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Clark County USGenWeb Archives Project Shipp Surname, 1800-1830 Census Tuggle, 1800-1850 Census Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Clark County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at

Clark County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Clark County Clark County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Clark County USGenWeb Archives Project Cunningham Cemetery Curry Cemetery Daniel Grove Memorial Cemetery (slow loading) Daughtee Cemetery Ervin Cemetery Hunt Cemetery , with photos Maddix Cemetery Winchester Cemetery Winchester Cemetery , Selected Burials Clark County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Clark County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Bethlehem Church Graveyard Bratton Graveyard Bush Clarmont Memorial Gardens Curry & Daniel Graveyard Early Winchesters Cemetery Inscriptions Ervin Cemetery Frank Anderson Farm Cemetery Greening Graveyard Haggard Graveyard Hall’s in Winchester Cemetery Hickman Cemeteries Hodges Cemetery Hunt Graveyard Excerpts from Old Graveyards in Clark County Moreland Cemetery Old

Kentucky Superstitions

CLARK CO. (Mayme Nunnelley) Most Kentucky superstitions are common to all classes of people because the negroes originally obtained most of their superstitions from the white and because the superstitions of most part of Kentucky are in almost all cases not recent invention but old survivals from a time when they were generally accepted by all germanic peoples and by all Indo-Europeans. The only class of original contributions made by the negroes to our stock of superstitions is that of the hoodoo or voodoo signs which are brought from Africa by the ancestors of the present colored people of America.

Biographical Sketch of Ryon, W. M., Colonel

Mier Prisoner Colonel William M. Ryon, of Fort Bend County, one of the most gallant of the heroes known to Texas history, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, resided for several years in Alabama, and came to Texas in 1837, landing at the mouth of the Brazos, where he clerked, kept hotel, and followed various occupations for a time. In 1839 he was a member of a surveying party that laid off the town of Austin, the newly selected site for the seat of government of the Republic of Texas, and later went to Fort Bend County, and made that his