Collection: Town History of Fryeburg Maine

Grover Post

Grover Post, No. 126, was organized by sixteen veterans of Fryeburg and Lovell on Dec. 24, 1884. Wm. C. Towle was chosen first commander, Tobias L. Eastman and others completing the staff, the itemized list of which was burned in the recent fire. The membership increased until at one time there were sixty-nine members. For about two years the meetings were alternated between this village and Lovell, which arrangement was followed by the formation of Parker Post at the latter village. Grover Post now numbers 35 members. Grover Circle, No. 11, was formed by the ladies as a relief corps.

Fryeburg Village Fire Companies ~ Fires

This corporation was chartered March 1, 1887, for the purpose of organizing for protection from fire. On the last day of the month an organizing meeting was held at which John C. Gerry was chosen clerk; Thos. C. Shirley, treasurer; Asa 0. Pike, Wm. Gordon and John Weston, assessors; and A. R. Jenness, F. L. Mark and Seth W. Fife, fire wardens. This action followed the burning of the original and celebrated Oxford House which occurred Feb. 14, preceding. The earliest DESTRUCTIVE FIRE of note was in 1 843, Sept. 15, when “Eastman’s Coffee House,” with two stores and two

Fryeburg Horse Railroad

This company was chartered in March 1887, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining a horse railroad in the village and to run to the Chautauqua grounds. It was at once organized and $5075 capital stock issued, which was taken by thirty stockholders. The road was installed and equipped that season, opened July 25, but did not run regularly until the following year. This road has remained under the general management of Seth W . Fife, and has been in operation each year since it begun. A total of 12,000 persons are sometimes carried annually during the running season, from

Patrons of Husbandry

Fryeburg Grange, No. 197, was organized at Fryeburg Centre in Feb. 1888, with 18 charter members. B. Walker McKeen was chosen the first master, and has been followed in this capacity by John F. Charles, A. P. Gordon, John S. Ames, David Chandler, E. C. Buzzell, I. A. Walker, Simeon Charles and A. W. McKeen. This order now numbers fiftyeight members. The leading officers chosen for 1907 are A. W. McKeen, master; Leon D. Charles, overseer; Mehitable McAllister, lecturer; Rosina McKeen, chaplin, Simeon Charles, treasurer, and I. A. McKeen, secretary.

Bridges, Canal, Post Offices of Fryeburg, Maine

Dea. Richard Eastman operated a ferry for many years near the point where the toll bridge was erected in 1870; this bridge is 76 feet long, being the shortest of the seven bridges which span the Saco and Canal. The first bridge built was at Swan’s Falls about 1780. The oldest now in use is Weston’s bridge, 250 feet long, built in 1844, according to Wm. Gordon. Canal bridge 272 feet long, was built in 1846; Walker’s bridge 164 feet, in 1848; Charles river bridge (a tributary) 87 feet, in 1856; Island bridge, 110 feet, in 1862; Hemlock bridge 116,

West Oxford Agricultural Association

The WEST OXFORD AGRICULTURAL ASSOCIATION AND FAIR was organized and established in 1851. For over half a century this has been an important factor in the life and social and commercial developement of a wide field.

Act of Incorporation – Organization of Fryeburg, Maine

In the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy six. An Act for erecting a Tract of Land Coold Fryeburg of two thousand one hundred and seventy two Rods square Lying in the County of York, which was granted as a Township to Joseph Frye, Esq., Anno Domoni seventeen hundred sixty-two and Confirmed Anno Domoni seventeen hundred sixty-three into a town by the name of Fryeburg. Whereas the Inhabitance of that tract of Land Consisting of Proprietors & non Proprietors Promiscuously settled thereon Having lately been united in ordaining a Minister of the Gospel among them, are

The Maine Indians

Before the encroachment of pale faced settlers, the entire valley of the Saco and its tributaries was peopled by the numerous Sokokis Indians. These were considered the parent tribe of the Abenaki Nation, which at one time peopled the whole of Maine. One of the most eloquent and statesmanlike of their chiefs once said in council, “We received our lands from the Great Father of Life; we hold only from Him.” Their title was unquestionable and unmolested, they roamed the valley from their village at the Lower Falls (Saco) to the settlement on the great bend, on the intervales of

The Pequawket Expedition

On April 16, the company bade farewell to their friends and kindred in Dunstable, Mass., the home of many of the party, and proceeded to Contoocook, and to the west shore of Ossipee Lake. Here they halted and erected a fort which should serve as a rallying point and base of supplies. By this time two men had become disabled. One had returned home accompanied by a friend, Benj. Kidder was left at the fort, with the surgeon and a guard of eight. The remaining thirty-four men took up the trail to Pequawket with good courage. On Tuesday, two days

Fryeburg Water Works

In 1882, the Fryeburg Water Co. was organized by local citizens under the direction of Dr. D. Lamson Lowell, for the purpose of installing a system for supplying pure water from Green Hill mountain in Conway. There a series of boiling springs was dammed back, forming a reservoir covering about an acre less than three miles from the village. A system of 10, 8, and 6 inch pipe conducts the water to the village, 156 feet below, the pipe passing under the Saco 300 feet below Weston’s bridge. A natural force of 65 pounds is produced giving ample fire protection