Ohio

Threads of ancestors, Telford – Ritchie – Mize

Alexander Telford, Sr. and his family immigrated from Ireland to land near Rockbridge Virginia during or before 1760. Alexander Telford, Jr. (1760-1844), was born near Rockbridge, Virginia, served in the Revolutionary War, married twice, and moved to Ohio, settling in Miami County. Descendants and relatives lived in Virginia, Ohio, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee and elsewhere. Major families: Cleghorn, Maxwell, Millican, Mize, Richey, Seawright, and Telford.

Descendants of John and Mary Howes of Montgomery County, Maryland

John Howes of Montgomery County, Maryland, was born ” … after 1740, m[arried] Mary_____, and d[ied] between November, 1808 and March 1809. He is buried in Laytonsville, Maryland with his mother, his brother James and daughter Sarah. About a year after his death his widow, Mary, went to Bucks County, Kentucky.”–P. 8. Descendants and relatives lived in Maryland, Kentucky, New York, Michigan, Ohio, California, Illinois, Massachusetts, Washington, D. C., Missouri, Nebraska, Colorado, California, Maine, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere.

The Waitley family in the United States

John S. Waitley is the earliest known ancestor of the Waitley name in the United States. According to this sketch, John S. Waitley was a native of Scotland. His parents came to America and settled in Massachusetts. Later his mother was lost at sea when on a return visit to Scotland. John S. Waitley married Lydia Bartlett, a daughter of Josiah Bartlett, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He became a minister of the Free-will Baptist Church. He moved to Ashtabula County, Ohio, lived there several years and later moved to Canton, Ohio. He died in Knox County, Ohio, in 1868 at the age of 96. His wife died in 1858 in Knox County, Ohio. They had lived in Mt. Vernon most of the time.

Birmingham: reflections on community

This book is the second volume of a collaborative project called “Birmingham Remembers” Residents of the Birmingham neighborhood had been interviewed in the 1980s. With this project the participants comments are organized by topic. Topics include heritage, education, religion, work, recreation, neighborhood, rituals, holidays, the Great Depression, military service, the Hungarian Revolution, activism and reminiscences.”

Ancestry of Elmer C. Packard of Brockton Massachusetts

For nearly two hundred and seventy-five years the Packard family has been one prominent and influential in New England, and it has become a most numerous family, too, many of whose members both at home and abroad have given a good account of themselves. Samuel Packard, the immigrant ancestor of this family, became one of …

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Washburn Genealogy of Bridgewater Massachusetts

John Washburn, first of the name here, was an early settler in New England, and was a resident of Duxbury, Mass., before 1632, in which year he had an action in court against Edward Doten. He was named in the assessment of taxes in 1633, and in 1634 bought a place from Edward Bonparse known as “Eagle’s Nest.” He and his two sons, John and Philip, were included with those able to bear arms in 1643. He and his son John were original proprietors of Bridgewater, and they with the son Philip settled in the town as early as 1665. He died in Bridgewater before 1670.

Descendants of Matthew Watson of Leicester, Massachusetts

Matthew Watson (d. 1720), of English lineage, married Mary Orr in 1695, and in 1718 the family immigrated from Ireland to Boston, Massachusetts and settled in Leicester, Massachusetts. Descendants and relatives lived in New England, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Nebraska, Rhode Island, California, Nevada, Michigan and elsewhere. Includes Watson, Armington, Bemis, Denny, Draper, Kent, Washburn, Bailey, Barnard, Belcher, Bent, Biscoe, Bolles, Breckenridge, Bright, Browning, Bryant, Bullock, Burrage, Dennis, Fisher, Foster, Green, Hayward, Hobbs, Hodgkins, Holman, Howard, Jenks, Jones, Kellogg, Kitchell, Knight, Lazelle, Livermore, Loring, Mason, Maynard, Munger, Patrick, Prouty, Remington, Reed, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Sadler, Sibley, Snow, Sprague, Stone, Studley, Symonds, Taitt, Thomas, Thompson, Trask, Tucker, Waite, Webster, Westcott, Wheeler, Whittermore, Wilson, Woods and related families.

Some Descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor, Connecticut

Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor. Thomas Rowley. Thomas Rowley (Rowell) a cordwainer, was in Windsor Connecticut as early as 1662, and Simsbury Connecticut by 1670. He died 1 May, 1705/8, estate inventory dated 1 May 1708. Married at Windsor, 5 May, 1669 by Rev. Wolcott, Mary Denslow, daughter of Henry, Windsor, born 10 …

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Notes on the McCoy Family

James McCoy (1720-1802), of Scottish lineage, immigrated about 1735 from Ireland to Pennsylvania, and served with Capt. Hyte in Kentucky or Tennessee. He later returned to Pennsylvania, and married Anne Bruce (born 1725 in Leochel-Cushnie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland and a descendant of Robert the Bruce), settling at Brown’s Fort (now Brownsville), Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Descendants and relatives lived in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Missouri and elsewhere. Includes McCoy, Brown, Christian, Huston, Little, Mccormick, Mull, Payne, Taggart and related families.

Fisher Genealogical History

This manuscript starts with Sebastian Fisher, a native of Germany, with his wife Susanna and their two small children, embarked for England at Rotterdam, Holland, on July 28, 1708. The family came with the intention of settling on land in the Schoharie Valley in New York, but found on arrival that they did not hold legal tender to the land, since the land was not first purchased from the Native Americans. Sebastian then moved with other German immigrants who had also purchased land to the Tulpehocken Valley of Pennsylvania, where he settled his family. The 76 pages of the manuscript take some of the descendants of Sebastian and Susanna Fisher into the 20th century.

United States Bureau of Land Management Tract Books, 1800-c. 1955

3,907 land management tract books containing official records of the land status and transactions involving surveyed public lands arranged by state and then by township and range. These books indicate who obtained the land, and include a physical description of the tract and where the land is located. The type of transaction is also recorded such as cash entry, credit entry, homesteads, patents (deeds) granted by the Federal Government, and other conveyances of title such as Indian allotments, internal improvement grants (to states), military bounty land warrants, private land claims, railroad grants, school grants, and swamp grants. Additional items of information included in the tract books are as follows: number of acres, date of sale, purchase price, land office, entry number, final Certificate of Purchase number, and notes on relinquishments and conversions.

Ohio World War 2 Casualties – Army, Air Force

This database contains War Department casualties (Army and Army Air Force personnel) from World War II for Ohio. Information provided includes serial number, rank and type of casualty. The birthplace or residence of the deceased is not indicated. An introduction explaining how the list was compiled, a statistical tabulation, and the descriptions of the types of casualties incurred are also included.

Early Land Ownership and Township Plats, 1785-1898

These township plat maps began with the Public Lands Survey in the United States initiated by the Land Ordinance Act of 1785, and this collection includes maps for all or parts of Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin. Maps were prepared from survey field notes taken by deputy surveyors and can include physical details and man-made improvements. They also indicate township and section lines, section numbers, acreage of holdings, and sometimes names of landholders.

Ancestors of George Mitchell Hooper of Bridgewater, MA

The Hooper family, to which belonged the late George Mitchell Hooper, one of Bridgewater’s well-known citizens, is an old and distinguished one in New England. George Mitchell Hooper, son of Mitchell, was born in the town of Bridgewater Sept. 1, 1838. He received his education in the public schools and Bridgewater Academy, later attending Peirce Academy and the State normal school at Bridgewater, graduating from the latter institution in 1857. After leaving school he engaged in teaching, a profession he followed for one year and then began the manufacture of brick with his father, a business in which he engaged for half a century. He was also a surveyor. He was identified with the banking interests of Bridgewater, having been one of the trustees of the Bridgewater Savings Bank, also filling the office of clerk. He was clerk and treasurer of the Bridgewater Cemetery Association; a member of the Plymouth County Agricultural Association, of which for years he was treasurer, and was secretary; and trustee of the Memorial Public Library. He died July 2, 1909, in his seventy-first year. On Oct. 16, 1861, Mr. Hooper was married to Mary E. Josselyn, who was born at Hanson, Mass., daughter of Hervey and Elizabeth (Howland) Josselyn. She died Jan. 30, 1884, and was buried in Mount Prospect cemetery. Eight children were born of this marriage.

Grinnell Family of New Bedford, MA

Since the early settlement of Newport and Portsmouth, R. I., shortly after 1638, the Grinnells have been identified with Rhode Island and Massachusetts history, the earlier generations living largely in the towns of Newport county, R. I., and for the past hundred and more years branches of this southern Rhode Island family have been representative of the best citizenship in the old Massachusetts town of New Bedford. At New Bedford lived Capt. Cornelius Grinnell, a patriot of the Revolution, and long engaged in the merchant service, who married into the old historic Howland family, and one of whose sons, Joseph Grinnell, for almost a decade represented the New Bedford district in the United States Congress, and was long prominent as a merchant and manufacturer and banker of the town; and there lived the late Lawrence Grinnell, father of the late Frederick Grinnell, who so long was at the head of the Providence Steam and Gas Pipe Company and the General Eire Extinguisher Company, a man of genius in mechanical lines, whose inventions gave him distinction, and one of whose sons, Russell Grinnell, is at this time vice president of the General Fire Extinguisher Company. It is with this New Bedford branch of the Grinnell family this article deals.

WPA Annals of Cleveland, 1818-1937

During the New Deal Era, workers of Annals of Cleveland staff summarized and indexed material from early Cleveland newspapers, beginning with the inaugural issue of the city’s first paper, the July 31, 1818 Cleaveland Gazette and Commercial Register. The project provided jobs for unemployed white-collar workers during the Depression of the 1930s and created an important record of early life and thought in the city of Cleveland.

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