Genealogy

The family tree of John Steele, 1842 to 1962

Ethyl M. Steele Thompson’s purpose in penning this manuscript was to list by family all descendants of John Steele, who came from Scotland to Canada to reside until his death, in 1899, in Asphodel Township, Peterborough County, Province of Ontario, Canada. The genealogy begins with Robert Steel, who, with his wife and family, emigrated from Scotland to Canada. This manuscript is unsourced, and large portions may come from the personal knowledge of it’s author, especially those contemporaneous with it’s publication.

The Pollak Family of Pressburg, Hungary and Vienna, Austria

The earliest Pollak ancestor she mentions is Eduard Pollak (1817-7 Aug 1888). His wife was Katharina Ratzersdorfer (1819-8 Apr 1891). The record of his death describes him as a business manager from Pressburg, Hungary. Sometime before 1848, Eduard and Katharina moved to Vienna, where they had five children: Moritz, Wilhelm, Ignaz, Heinrich, and Flora. This self published manuscript takes the talented family of Eduard and Katharina down to present day.

Southern kith and kin; a record of my children’s ancestors

v. 1. The Locketts; v. 2. Davis family and their connections; v. 3. Major James Scarborough : his ancestors and descendants; v. 4. Family potpourri. Surnames: Aldredge, Bryans, Bullock, Clark, Davis, Eason, Gardners, Grigg, Hanson, Hill, Jones, Lockett, Osborne, Russell, Scarborough, Sims, Smith, Stovall, Stringer, Sumners, Tatom, and Tharpe.

First two hundred years of the Oldham family in America

For over 40 years I have known that my grandmother’s grandmother was Betsey Oldham of Hanover, Mass. She married there in 1776 Ebenezer Wing, Jr. of the same town. Of her parentage I possessed neither record nor tradition. This winter I determined to find out, if possible, the names of her father and mother. I …

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Threads of ancestors, Telford – Ritchie – Mize

Alexander Telford, Sr. and his family immigrated from Ireland to land near Rockbridge Virginia during or before 1760. Alexander Telford, Jr. (1760-1844), was born near Rockbridge, Virginia, served in the Revolutionary War, married twice, and moved to Ohio, settling in Miami County. Descendants and relatives lived in Virginia, Ohio, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee and elsewhere. Major families: Cleghorn, Maxwell, Millican, Mize, Richey, Seawright, and Telford.

Sabots and slippers

Sabots and slippers is a fancy title for a history and a genealogy of the ancestors of Kenneth F. Mackenzie born 7 Oct 1882 in Truro, Nova Scotia the son of Hugh Mackenzie and Jean Walker Blanchard. He married 23 June 1910 Aileen Sinclair. The families lived in Nova Scotia and New England.

Gosse Timber and Adjoining Branches

This is the genealogy of Martin and Charlot Linde Gosse, who came to America about 1846 from Prussia. They settled in Sheboygan County, Wisconsin and after their arrival with their children, Martin and Charlot purchased land in Town Mosel and became farmers. The known children of Martin and Chariot were: August (1829-1902), Henrietta (1831-1911), Charles Gustav (1834-1880), William (1836-1909), Herman (1838-1915), Augusta (1843-1925), Gottlieb Heinrich (1845-1888), and Johann H. (unknown).

Cleland Cousins

From time to time, Clelands of County Down have come to America and settled permanently, establishing American branches of this ancient family whose roots reach down through several centuries. There are also a number of Cleland families in this country whose original immigrant ancestor came directly from Scotland, some of these coming at an earlier …

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A history of George Summers of Douglass and Lower Dublin townships, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

George Summers, progenitor of one of the Summers Families in America, was born in Germany shortly after the year 1690, and arrived in this country on the 22nd ot September in the year of 1752, landing at Philadelphia on the ship “Brothers, in charge of Captain Wm. Muir. He was married to Elizabeth . They had six sons and one daughter, namely Philip, Henry, John, Martin, George, Peter and Margaretha Elizabeth. Two of them, Philip and Henry, however, did not come over with their father but arrived two years later, September 30th, 1754 on the ship “Edinburg also landing at Philadelphia.

One Hundred Years of the Moravians in Mayodan, North Carolina 1896-1996

100 years of history of the Moravian Church and it’s members of Mayodan, North Carolina. The Moravian Church of Mayodan, North Carolina, Rockingham County was dedicated to the Glory of God on November 29, 1896. The first religious service held in the village in July 1895, under the trees near where the Church stands was the actual beginning of the Church. Howard Edward Rondthaler (now Bishop-Moravian Church Southern Province) a surveyor at the time living at the boarding house and Samuel Permania Tesh, who was also staying there, both Moravians from Winston-Salem, conducted this service. The Higgins family, who kept the boarding house, the other boarders there and a few people from the village gathered around as the service progressed. Howard Rondthaler, son of Edward Rondthaler, Bishop also of the Moravian Church, studied for the ministry and became the first pastor of the Mayodan Moravian Church.

History of the John Wilson Family

John Wilson has entered into his rest after an eventful life of eighty-one years, that begun in Ayrshire, Scotland, on August 16, 1811, and ended in Iowa May 21, 1892. He came to the United States in 1851 with the home-seeking immigrants that were attracted by the mild laws and new lands of the great republic. He was a representative of the Scotch covenanters that had struggled for religious and civic liberty for many generations and held aloof from participation in governmental, affairs on account of dissatisfaction with church settlements. When a young man he wanted to come to the United States and was prevented by his mother, who could not endure the thought at that time. This is his and his descendants stories, 4 generations deep!

The Wilson Family of West Virginia

This brief history has been gleaned from old family records, correspondence with other members, and histories of Ritchie, Barbour, Harrison and Randolph Counties, West Virginia. The first known ancestor was David Wilson, who was born in Scotland about 1650; he had a son David, born about 1685, who was forced to flee from Scotland to Ireland owing to his being on the losing side in the Scotch Rebellion of 1715. His son William (b. Nov. 19, 1722; d. June 12, 1801) came to America about 1736; married Elizabeth Blackburn, also of Scotch-Irish descent, about 1746, and settled on Trout Run near Moorefield, Hardy County, W. Va. The Land Office at Richmond shows that he and his sons patented many tracts of land in what is now Hampshire, Hardy, and Grant Counties. Nothing further is known of him as to where he lived and died.

The Wilson Family, Somerset and Barter Hill Branch

In the preparation of “The Wilson family, Somerset and Barter Hill branch” I have discovered two lists of the names of the sons and daughters of Col. Ben and Ann Seay Wilson of “Somerset” in Cumberland County, Virginia, in addition to the list found in my father’s notes. None of these was arranged in the same chronological order. It was my good fortune in 1915 to find the Bible, claimed to be the Bible of Col. Ben and Ann Seay Wilson of “Somerset” in Cumberland County, Virginia. At that time this was in the hands of Miss Clementine Reid Wilson, Col. Ben’s great-granddaughter, and it was my privilege to copy, with the aid of a reading glass, for the ink was badly faded, the names of their children from that Bible in the same chronological order in which they were recorded. This chronological order, and military records found, support each other. I therefore believe that this sketch contains the most accurate chronological list of Col. Ben’s and Ann Seay Wilson’s children to be found outside of his Bible.

Notes on the Genealogy of the Bethel Vermont Wilson Family

Compiled by Harold F. Wilson, while in Bethel, Vermont, in August, 1948, and completed in his home in Pitman, New Jersey, November, 1948. Material from: (1) James J. Wilson family Bible, notes taken by H. F. W. while convalescing at the M. L. Wilson Homestead in Bethel; (2) conversations with H. F. W.’s Aunt, Miss Susan E. Wilson, and with his Uncle, John J. Wilson; (3) data from two scrapbooks of James J. Wilson at the home on North Main Street, Bethel, just north of Christ Church; (4) letter from Mrs, Jennie Wilson Dustin, of Randolph, Vt., Nov., 1948; (5) material from H. F. W.’s father’s Scrapbook (Guy Wilson’s); (6) data from Charles Knowles Bolton, Scotch-Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America (Boston, 1910); information from Charles A. Hanna, The Scotch-Irish, Vol. II (New York, 1902); also from Osgood, American Colonies in the 18th Century, Vol. III for the Scotch-Irish background, and from Robt. P. Tristram Coffin, The Kennebec, Cradle of Americans (New York, 1938), and from John Fiske, New France and New England (Boston, 1902) for the Merrymeeting Bay episode.

Wainwright and related families

These sketches were written primarily to trace the paternal ancestry of Mary Wainwright who was born in Somerset County, Maryland, May 11, 1818. She married, November 15, 1837, William Underwood Roberts. They became the parents of a family of six sons and five daughters, all of whom were born at Jesterville and lived to mature years. Mary Wainwright Roberts had, at the time of her death, October 11, 1904, at the age of eighty-six years, more than eighty living descendants. Her ancestry involves, besides her Wainwright forebears, the Cannons, the Bloyces, the Evanses, the Streets, the Rices, and others about whom something is said in this sketch, as well as several other ancient Somerset families.

The Waitley family in the United States

John S. Waitley is the earliest known ancestor of the Waitley name in the United States. According to this sketch, John S. Waitley was a native of Scotland. His parents came to America and settled in Massachusetts. Later his mother was lost at sea when on a return visit to Scotland. John S. Waitley married Lydia Bartlett, a daughter of Josiah Bartlett, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He became a minister of the Free-will Baptist Church. He moved to Ashtabula County, Ohio, lived there several years and later moved to Canton, Ohio. He died in Knox County, Ohio, in 1868 at the age of 96. His wife died in 1858 in Knox County, Ohio. They had lived in Mt. Vernon most of the time.

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