Search Results for: Cree

Cree Tribe

Cree Indians, Cree First Nation (contracted from Kristinaux, French form of Kenistenoag, given as one of their own names). An important Algonquian tribe of British America whose former habitat was in Manitoba and Assiniboin, between Red and Saskatchewan rivers. They ranged northeastward down Nelson river to the vicinity of Hudson Bay, and northwestward almost to Athabasca lake. When they first became known to the Jesuit missionaries a part of them resided in the region of James Bay, as it is stated as early as 1640 that “they dwell on the rivers of the north sea where Nipissing go to trade

Quebec First Nations

The following information are contact information and webpage addresses for First Nations of Quebec.   Abenaki Abénakis de Wôlinak Bande d’Odanak Grand Conseil de la nation Waban-Aki Innus de Ekuanitshit Alderville First Nation Innu-Takuaikan Uashat mak Mani-Utenam Algonquin of Timiskaming P.O. Box 336 NOTRE-DAME-DU-NORD QC J0Z 3B0 Listuguj First Nation 17 Riverside Drive West Listuguj, PQ, G0C 2R0 Atikamekw Nation Council 290 St. Joceph, C.P. 848 La Tuque, Quebec G9X 3P6 Keewaytinook Okimakanak Bande de Betsiamites Manawan (Manouane (French) Bande des Montagnais Essipit Micmac Nation of Gespeg 783 boulevard Pointe-Navarre C.P. 69 Fontenelle, Québec, Canada, G0E 1H0 Bearskin Lake Mohawks

Maskegon Tribe

Maskegon Indians, Maskegon First Nation, Maskegon People, Swampy Crees (Mŭskīgōk, ‘they of the marshes or swamps.’- W. J. ). An Algonquian tribe so closely related to the Cree that they have appropriately been called a subtribe. According to Warren the Maskegon, with the Cree and the Monsoni, form the northern division of the Chippewa group, from which they separated about eight generations before 1850. The traders knew them as Swampy Crees. From the time the Maskegon became known as a distinct tribe until they were placed on reserves by the Canadian government they were scattered over the swampy region stretching

Etchareottine Tribe

Etchareottine Indians, Etchareottine Nation (‘people dwelling in the shelter’). An Athapascan tribe occupying the country of Great Slave lake and upper Mackenzie river to the Rocky mountains, including the lower Liard valley, British America. Their range extends from Hay river to Ft Good Hope, and they once lived on the shores of Lake Athabasca and in the forests stretching northward to Great Slave lake. They were a timid, pacific people, called ‘the people sheltered by willows’ by the Chipewyan, indicating a riparian fisher folk. Their Cree neighbors, who harried and plundered them and carried them off into bondage, called them Awokanak,

Siksika Tribe

Siksika Indians. A tribe of the Siksika confederacy (see below). They now (1905) live on a reservation in Alberta, Canada, on upper Bow River, and are officially known as the Running Rabbit and Yellow Horse bands. They were divided into the following subtribes or bands: Aisikstukiks, Apikaiyiks, Emi-tahpahksaiyiks, Motahtosiks, Puhksinahmahyiks, Saiyiks, Siksinokaks,Tsiniktsistsoyiks. Pop. 942 in 1902, 795 in 1909. Siksika Confederacy Siksika Confederacy, (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of ogkatsh ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the

Etheneldeli Tribe

Etheneldeli Indians, Etheneldeli Nation (‘caribou-eaters’). An Athapascan tribe living east of Lake Caribou and Lake Athabasca, in the barren grounds which extend to Hudson Bay 1Petitot, Dict. Dene-Dindjié, XX, 1876. Franklin 2Journ. Polar Seas, II, 241, 1824 placed them between Athabasca and Great Slave lakes and Churchill river, whence they resorted to Ft Chipewyan. Ross 3MS., B. A. E. makes them apart of the eastern Tinne, their habitat being to the north and east of the head of Lake Athabasca, extending to the end of Great Slave Lake. Rocky river separates them from the Tatsanottine. In the east are the barren

Nipissing Tribe

Nipissing Indians, Nipissing Nation, Nipissing First Nation, Nipissing People (‘at the little water or lake’, referring to Lake Nipissing; Nipisirinien, ‘little-water people’). A tribe of the Algonkin. When they first became known to the French, in 1613, they were residing in the vicinity of Lake Nipissing, Ontario, which has been their home during most of the time to the present. Having been attacked, about 1650, by the Iroquois, and many of them slain, they fled for safety to Lake Nipigon 1Mackenzie, Voy., x1i, note, 1802 , where Allouez visited them in 1667, but they were again on Lake Nipissing in 1671. A

Blackfeet Tribe

Blackfeet Indians, Siksika Tribe, Siksika Indians (‘black feet’, from siksinam ‘black’, ka the root of oqkatsh, ‘foot’. The origin of the name is disputed, but it is commonly believed to have reference to the discoloring of their moccasins by the ashes of the prairie fires; it may possibly have reference to black-painted moccasins such as were worn by the Pawnee, Sihasapa, and other tribes). An important Algonquian confederacy of the northern plains, consisting of three subtribes, the Siksika proper or Blackfeet, the Kainah or Bloods, and the Piegan, the whole body being popularly known as Blackfeet. In close alliance with